Quotations About / On: ITALY

  • 1.
    When intimacy followed love in Italy there were no longer any vain pretensions between two lovers.
    (Stendhal [Marie Henri Beyle] (1783-1842), French novelist. The Charterhouse of Parma, ch. VI, Dupont (1839) (trans. by Jeri King).)
  • 2.
    Italy is a geographical expression.
    (Prince Metternich (1773-1859), Austrian statesman. letter, Nov. 19, 1849. Memoirs, vol. 7 (1883). The Prussian statesman Otto von Bismarck used the same term, in a marginal comment on a letter of Nov. 1876, to the Russian Chancellor Gorchakov: "Whoever speaks of Europe is wrong: it is a geographical expression.")
    More quotations from: Prince Metternich, italy
  • 3.
    Italy is a poor country full of rich people.
    (Richard Gardner (b. 1927), U.S. diplomat, former ambassador to Rome. quoted in Observer (London, Aug. 16, 1981).)
    More quotations from: Richard Gardner, italy, people
  • 4.
    There is something majestic in the bad taste of Italy.
    (E.M. (Edward Morgan) Forster (1879-1970), British novelist, essayist. Where Angels Fear to Tread, ch. 6 (1905).)
    More quotations from: E.M. (Edward Morgan) Forster, italy
  • 5.
    A man who has not been in Italy, is always conscious of an inferiority.
    (Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, April 11, 1776 (1791). Said over supper with James Boswell and the Corsican patriot Pasquale Paoli.)
    More quotations from: Samuel Johnson, italy
  • 6.
    Because one has little fear of shocking vanity in Italy, people adopt an intimate tone very quickly and discuss personal things.
    (Stendhal [Marie Henri Beyle] (1783-1842), French novelist. The Charterhouse of Parma, ch. VI, Dupont (1839) (trans. by Jeri King).)
  • 7.
    Travelling is the ruin of all happiness! There's no looking at a building here after seeing Italy.
    (Fanny Burney (1752-1840), British author. Mr. Meadows, in Cecilia, bk. 4, ch. 2 (1782).)
    More quotations from: Fanny Burney, italy, happiness
  • 8.
    It's easy to understand why the most beautiful poems about England in the spring were written by poets living in Italy at the time.
    (Philip Dunne (1908-1992), U.S. screenwriter. Joseph L. Mankiewicz. Miles Fairley (George Sanders), The Ghost and Mrs. Muir, to Mrs. Muir during a spring shower (1947). From the novel by R.A. Dick.)
  • 9.
    It's easy to understand why the most beautiful poems about England in the spring were written by poets living in Italy at the time.
    (Philip Dunne (1908-1992), U.S. screenwriter, and Joseph L. Mankiewicz. Miles Fairley (George Sanders), The Ghost and Mrs. Muir (1947). To Mrs. Muir during a spring shower. From the novel by R.A. Dick.)
  • 10.
    Everything in Italy that is particularly elegant and grand ... borders upon insanity and absurdity—or at least is reminiscent of childhood.
    (Alexander Herzen (1812-1870), Russian journalist, political thinker. Trans. by Constance Garnett (1924-1927). "Miscellaneous Pieces: Beyond the Alps," vol. 3, pt. 8, My Past and Thoughts (1921).)
    More quotations from: Alexander Herzen, italy, childhood
[Hata Bildir]