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Quotations About / On: JOY

  • 61.
    That mortal man who hath more of joy than sorrow in him, that mortal man cannot be true—not true, or undeveloped.
    (Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Moby-Dick (1851), ch. 96, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 6, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1988).)
    More quotations from: Herman Melville, sorrow, joy
  • 62.
    The sweetest joys of life grow in the very jaws of its perils.
    (Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Pierre (1852), bk. IV, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 7, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1971).)
    More quotations from: Herman Melville, life
  • 63.
    There is no beautifier of complexion, or form, or behavior, like the wish to scatter joy and not pain around us.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Behavior," The Conduct of Life (1860).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, pain, joy
  • 64.
    The joys of parents are secret, and so are their griefs and fears.
    (Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British lawyer, philosopher and essayist. "Of Parents and Children," Essays (1625).)
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  • 65.
    The life of man is the true romance, which when it is valiantly conducted will yield the imagination a higher joy than any fiction.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Lecture, March 3, 1884, in Amory Hall, Boston, Massachusetts. "New England Reformers," Essays, Second Series (1844).)
  • 66.
    For the time of towns is tolled from the world by funereal chimes, but in nature the universal hours are counted by succeeding tribes of animals and plants, and by growth of joy on joy.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "The Poet," Essays, Second Series (1844).)
  • 67.
    The imagination is the spur of delights ... all depends upon it, it is the mainspring of everything; now, is it not by means of the imagination one knows joy? Is it not of the imagination that the sharpest pleasures arise?
    (Marquis de Sade (1740-1814), French author. Dolmancé, "Dialogue the Third," Philosophy in the Bedroom (1795).)
    More quotations from: Marquis de Sade, imagination, joy
  • 68.
    Sun up, sun down, the days slip by and the sand lifted by the breeze will swallow my ship; but I will die here, as I am, standing in my little garden. What joy!
    (Simone Schwarz-Bart (b. 1938), Gaudeloupean author. The Bridge of Beyond, p. 249, Éditions du Seuil (1972).)
    More quotations from: Simone Schwarz-Bart, sun, joy
  • 69.
    An attitude of philosophic doubt, of suspended judgment, is repugnant to the natural man. Belief is an independent joy to him.
    (William Minto (1845-1893), Scottish logician and literary critic. Logic: Inductive and Deductive, introduction, Scribner's (1899).)
    More quotations from: William Minto, joy
  • 70.
    It is in these acts called trivialities that the seeds of joy are forever wasted, until men and women look round with haggard faces at the devastation their own waste has made, and say, the earth bears no harvest of sweetness—calling their denial knowledge.
    (George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist, editor. Middlemarch, bk. 4, ch. 42 (1871).)
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