Quotations About / On: LONDON

  • 11.
    A hundred cabinet-makers in London can work a table or a chair equally well; but no one poet can write verses with such spirit and elegance as Mr. Pope.
    (David Hume (1711-1776), Scottish philosopher. "Of Eloquence," part I, essay XII, p. 99, Essays Moral, Political, and Literary, ed. Eugene F. Miller, revised edition, Indianapolis, Liberty Fund, Inc. (1987).)
    More quotations from: David Hume, london, work
  • 12.
    The lowest and vilest alleys of London do not present a more dreadful record of sin than does the smiling and beautiful countryside.
    (Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930), British author. Sherlock Holmes, in The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, "Copper Beeches," (1892).)
  • 13.
    London, that great cesspool into which all the loungers and idlers of the Empire are irresistibly drained.
    (Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930), British author. Dr. Watson, in A Study in Scarlet, ch. 1 (1887).)
    More quotations from: Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, london
  • 14.
    A broken heart is a very pleasant complaint for a man in London if he has a comfortable income.
    (George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950), Anglo-Irish playwright, critic. Ann, in Man and Superman, act 4.)
  • 15.
    It was a Sunday afternoon, wet and cheerless; and a duller spectacle this earth of ours has not to show than a rainy Sunday in London.
    (Thomas De Quincey (1785-1859), British author. "The Pleasures of Opium," Confessions of an English Opium-Eater (1822). Recalling the day in 1804 when he first took opium.)
    More quotations from: Thomas De Quincey, sunday, london
  • 16.
    An actor who knows his business ought to be able to make the London telephone directory sound enthralling.
    (Donald Sinden (b. 1923), British stage and screen actor. Observer (London, February 12, 1989).)
    More quotations from: Donald Sinden, london
  • 17.
    The lowest and vilest alleys of London do not present a more dreadful record of sin than does the smiling and beautiful countryside.
    (Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930), British author. Sherlock Holmes to Watson, in "Copper Beeches," The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (1892).)
  • 18.
    America is a nation with no truly national city, no Paris, no Rome, no London, no city which is at once the social center, the political capital, and the financial hub.
    (C. Wright Mills (1916-1962), U.S. sociologist. The Power Elite, ch. 3 (1956).)
  • 19.
    It is the folly of too many to mistake the echo of a London coffee-house for the voice of the kingdom.
    (Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), Anglo-Irish satirist. repr. in Jonathan Swift: A Critical Edition of the Major Works, eds. Angus Ross and David Woolley (1984). The Conduct of the Allies (1711).)
    More quotations from: Jonathan Swift, london, house
  • 20.
    Cities give us collision. 'Tis said, London and New York take the nonsense out of a man.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Culture," The Conduct of Life (1860).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, london
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