Quotations About / On: LONDON

  • 21.
    It is the folly of too many to mistake the echo of a London coffee-house for the voice of the kingdom.
    (Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), Anglo-Irish satirist. repr. in Jonathan Swift: A Critical Edition of the Major Works, eds. Angus Ross and David Woolley (1984). The Conduct of the Allies (1711).)
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  • 22.
    Cities give us collision. 'Tis said, London and New York take the nonsense out of a man.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Culture," The Conduct of Life (1860).)
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  • 23.
    Carlyle is a critic who lives in London to tell this generation who have been the great men of our race.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Thomas Carlyle and His Works" (1847), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 4, p. 354, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
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  • 24.
    There are two places in the world where men can most effectively disappear—the city of London and the South Seas.
    (Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. "The South Seas" (1858-59), The Piazza Tales and Other Prose Pieces 1839-1860, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 9, eds. Harrison Hayford, Alma A. MacDougall, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1987). A lecture.)
    More quotations from: Herman Melville, london, city, world
  • 25.
    London ... remains a man's city where New York is chiefly a woman's. London has whole streets that cater to men's wants. It has its great solid phalanx of fortress clubs.
    (Louis Kronenberger (1904-1980), U.S. critic, editor. "Some Notes on New York," The Cart and the Horse, Knopf (1964).)
  • 26.
    “It was strange to stand there in front of the mirror and see myself like I was my own best friend, a kid wanted to hang with forever. This was a boy I could travel to the seacoasts with, a boy Id like to meet up with in foreign cities like Calcutta and London and Brazil, a boy I could trust who also had a good sense of humor and liked smoked oysters from a can and good weed and the occasional 40 ounces of malt. If I was going to be alone for the rest of my life this was the person I wanted to be alone with.”
    (Russell Banks, Rule of the Bone)
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  • 27.
    I had said to Mrs. Boscawen at table, "I believe this is about as much as can be made of life." I was really happy. My gay ideas of London in youth were realized and consolidated.
    (James Boswell (1740-1795), Scottish author. Laird of Auchinleck, journal, April 20, 1781, p. 328, McGraw-Hill (1977). Said at dinner in Mrs. Garrick's house, in the company of Samuel Johnson, Sir Joshua Reynolds, Dr. Charles Burney, and other friends.)
  • 28.
    One of the many to whom, from straightened circumstances, a consequent inability to form the associations they would wish, and a disinclination to mix with the society they could obtain, London is as complete a solitude as the plains of Syria.
    (Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. Nicholas Nickleby, ch. 20, p. 246 (1839).)
    More quotations from: Charles Dickens, london, solitude
  • 29.
    That's playgirl stuff, Brownie. I've seen them in London, Paris, Rome. They start life in a New York nightclub and end up covering the world like a paid advertisement. Not an honest feeling from her kneecap to her neck.
    (John Lee Mahin (1902-1984), U.S. screenwriter, and John Ford. Victor Marswell (Clark Gable), Mogambo, response to Brownie's (Philip Stainton) suggestion that he make a play for Kelly (Ava Gardner) (1953). Based on the play Red Dust by Wilson Collison.)
  • 30.
    I believe we shall come to care about people less and less.... The more people one knows the easier it becomes to replace them. It's one of the curses of London.
    (E.M. (Edward Morgan) Forster (1879-1970), British novelist, essayist. Margaret Shlegel, in Howard's End, ch. 15 (1910).)
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