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Quotations About / On: LONDON

  • 21.
    A hundred cabinet-makers in London can work a table or a chair equally well; but no one poet can write verses with such spirit and elegance as Mr. Pope.
    (David Hume (1711-1776), Scottish philosopher. "Of Eloquence," part I, essay XII, p. 99, Essays Moral, Political, and Literary, ed. Eugene F. Miller, revised edition, Indianapolis, Liberty Fund, Inc. (1987).)
    More quotations from: David Hume, london, work
  • 22.
    One of the many to whom, from straightened circumstances, a consequent inability to form the associations they would wish, and a disinclination to mix with the society they could obtain, London is as complete a solitude as the plains of Syria.
    (Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. Nicholas Nickleby, ch. 20, p. 246 (1839).)
    More quotations from: Charles Dickens, london, solitude
  • 23.
    That's playgirl stuff, Brownie. I've seen them in London, Paris, Rome. They start life in a New York nightclub and end up covering the world like a paid advertisement. Not an honest feeling from her kneecap to her neck.
    (John Lee Mahin (1902-1984), U.S. screenwriter, and John Ford. Victor Marswell (Clark Gable), Mogambo, response to Brownie's (Philip Stainton) suggestion that he make a play for Kelly (Ava Gardner) (1953). Based on the play Red Dust by Wilson Collison.)
  • 24.
    I believe we shall come to care about people less and less.... The more people one knows the easier it becomes to replace them. It's one of the curses of London.
    (E.M. (Edward Morgan) Forster (1879-1970), British novelist, essayist. Margaret Shlegel, in Howard's End, ch. 15 (1910).)
  • 25.
    ...the shiny-cheeked merchant bankers from London with eighties striped blue ties and white collars and double-barreled names and double chins and double-breasted suits, who said "ears" when they meant "yes" and "hice" when they meant "house" and "school" when they meant "Eton"...
    (John le Carré (b. 1931), British novelist. Roper's description of the people he calls "the Necessary Evils" in The Night Manager, ch. 17, Alfred A. Knopf (1993).)
  • 26.
    It is not the walls that make the city, but the people who live within them. The walls of London may be battered, but the spirit of the Londoner stands resolute and undismayed.
    (George VI (1895-1952), British monarch, King of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. Broadcast, September 23, 1940, to the Empire during German bomber offensive.)
    More quotations from: George VI, london, city, people
  • 27.
    It was a Sunday afternoon, wet and cheerless; and a duller spectacle this earth of ours has not to show than a rainy Sunday in London.
    (Thomas De Quincey (1785-1859), British author. "The Pleasures of Opium," Confessions of an English Opium-Eater (1822). Recalling the day in 1804 when he first took opium.)
    More quotations from: Thomas De Quincey, sunday, london
  • 28.
    Virtue, my pet, is an abstract idea, varying in its manifestations with the surroundings. Virtue in Provence, in Constantinople, in London, and in Paris bears very different fruit, but is none the less virtue.
    (Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Louise de Chaulieu to Renée de l'Estorade in a letter, in Letters of Two Brides (Mémoires de Deux Jeunes Mariées), in La Presse (1841-1842), Souverain (1842), included in the Scènes de la Vie Privée in the Comédie humaine (1845, trans. by George Saintsbury, 1971).)
    More quotations from: Honoré De Balzac, paris, london
  • 29.
    America is a nation with no truly national city, no Paris, no Rome, no London, no city which is at once the social center, the political capital, and the financial hub.
    (C. Wright Mills (1916-1962), U.S. sociologist. The Power Elite, ch. 3 (1956).)
  • 30.
    I love London society! I think it has immensely improved. It is entirely composed now of beautiful idiots and brilliant lunatics. Just what Society should be.
    (Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Mabel Chiltern, in An Ideal Husband, act 1.)
    More quotations from: Oscar Wilde, london, beautiful, love
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