Quotations About / On: LOSS

  • 11.
    'Win or loss remain the same if honoring the will of God'
    (From my poem 'God is a Comedian')
    More quotations from: Tushar Ray
  • 12.
    My win or loss only hurts the one who cares.
    (Thought of this while gaming with a friend. Questioned why some people can't seem to handle winning and loosing. Why they don't appreciate the opportunity for adventure. Turn's out it has to do with the focus, obsession, predisposition to compare and contrast thinking (OCD/PATTERN MIMICRY) .)
    More quotations from: Robert Plese
  • 13.
    'Women cannot understand a man's inner fights; men cannot understand a woman's losses.'
    (Anybody)
    More quotations from: Deniz Atay
  • 14.
    My love grows wide and shallow in an effort to spread my losses.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Eighth Selection, New York (1991).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley, love
  • 15.
    Every farewell combines loss and new freedom.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Ninth Selection, New York (1992).)
  • 16.
    No need to be sentimental to mourn the loss of Paradise.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Third Selection, New York (1986).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley, loss
  • 17.
    You're just wasting your breath and that's no great loss either!
    (S.J. Perelman, U.S. screenwriter, Arthur Sheekman, Will Johnstone, and Norman Z. McLeod. Groucho Marx, Monkey Business, a wisecrack made to his fellow stowaway Chico Marx (1931). Groucho has no character name in the credits—he is listed as one of the "Stowaways.")
    More quotations from: S.J Perelman, loss
  • 18.
    Progress may feel more like loss than gain.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Eleventh Selection, New York (1993).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley, loss
  • 19.
    Children, dear and loving children, can alone console a woman for the loss of her beauty.
    (Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Mme. Gaston in a letter to Mme. De l'Estorade, in Letters of Two Brides (Mémoires de Deux Jeunes Mariées), in La Presse (1841-1842), Souverain (1842), included in the Scènes de la Vie Privée in the Comédie humaine (1845, trans. by George Saintsbury, 1971).)
  • 20.
    Men sooner forget the death of their father than the loss of their patrimony.
    (Niccolò Machiavelli (1469-1527), Italian political philosopher, statesman. The Prince, ch. 17 (1514).)
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