Quotations About / On: LOSS

  • 31.
    Never does one feel oneself so utterly helpless as in trying to speak comfort for great bereavement. I will not try it. Time is the only comforter for the loss of a mother.
    (Jane Welsh Carlyle (1801-1866), Scottish poet. letter, Dec. 27, 1853, to her husband, Thomas Carlyle. Letters and Memorials (1883).)
  • 32.
    The boys dressed themselves, hid their accoutrements, and went off grieving that there were no outlaws any more, and wondering what modern civilization could claim to have done to compensate for their loss. They said they would rather be outlaws a year in Sherwood Forest than President of the United States forever.
    (Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, ch. 8 (1876).)
  • 33.
    The cultivation of one set of faculties tends to the disuse of others. The loss of one faculty sharpens others; the blind are sensitive in touch. Has not the extreme cultivation of the commercial faculty permitted others as essential to national life, to be blighted by disease?
    (J. Ellen Foster (1840-1910), U.S. attorney, temperance activist, and suffragist. What America Owes to Women, ch. 33 (1893). Reflecting on America's national prosperity.)
    More quotations from: J. Ellen Foster, loss, life
  • 34.
    I have always observed, when there is as much sour as sweet in a compliment, that an Englishman is eternally at a loss within himself, whether to take it, or let it alone: a Frenchman never is.
    (Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. A Sentimental Journey through France and Italy by Mr. Yorick (1768), ch. "Calais," ed. Gardner D. Stout, Jr., University of California Press (1967).)
    More quotations from: Laurence Sterne, loss, alone
  • 35.
    Women who have had no lovers, or having had one, two or three, have not found a husband, have perhaps rather had a miss than a loss, as men go.
    (Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. First edition, London (1753-1754). Harriet Byron, in Sir Charles Grandison, vol. 2, letter 2, Oxford University Press (1972, repr. 1986).)
  • 36.
    There will be but few people who, when at a loss for topics of conversation, will not reveal the more secret affairs of their friends.
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 2, pp. 245-246, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980); Human, All-Too- Human, p. 178, trans. by Marion Faber and Stephen Lehmann, Lincoln, Nebraska, University of Nebraska Press (1984). Human, All-Too-Human, "Man in Society," aphorism 327, "A Friend's Secret," (1878).)
    More quotations from: Friedrich Nietzsche, loss, people
  • 37.
    When a man laughs at his troubles he loses a good many friends. They never forgive the loss of their prerogative.
    (H.L. (Henry Lewis) Mencken (1880-1956), U.S. journalist, critic. The Vintage Mencken, ch. 47, p. 231, ed. Alistair Cooke, Vintage (1956).)
    More quotations from: H.L. (Henry Lewis) Mencken, loss
  • 38.
    Weep not for little Leonie, Abducted by a French Marquis! Though loss of honour was a wrench, Just think how it's improved her French.
    (Harry Graham (1874-1936), British author, rhymester. "Compensation," More Ruthless Rhymes for Heartless Hommes (1930).)
    More quotations from: Harry Graham, loss
  • 39.
    We now talk of our killed and wounded. There is however a very happy feeling. Those who escape regret of course the loss of comrades and friends, but their own escape and safety to some extent modifies their feelings.
    (Rutherford Birchard Hayes (1822-1893), U.S. president. Diary and Letters of Rutherford Birchard Hayes: Nineteenth President of the United States, vol. II, p. 530, ed. Charles Richard Williams, The Ohio State Archaeological and Historical Society, 5 vols. (1922-1926), Hayes to Lucy Webb Hayes (October 25, 1864). After the battle of Cedar Creek.)
  • 40.
    I never saw a fatter man; he'd have given my mother a stone or two and not felt the loss. Round as the "o" in rotund.
    (Angela Carter (1940-1992), British postmodern novelist. repr. Black Venus, Chatto & Windus (1985). "The Kitchen Child," p. 97, Vogue (1979).)
    More quotations from: Angela Carter, loss, mother
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