Quotations About / On: LOSS

  • 51.
    We now talk of our killed and wounded. There is however a very happy feeling. Those who escape regret of course the loss of comrades and friends, but their own escape and safety to some extent modifies their feelings.
    (Rutherford Birchard Hayes (1822-1893), U.S. president. Diary and Letters of Rutherford Birchard Hayes: Nineteenth President of the United States, vol. II, p. 530, ed. Charles Richard Williams, The Ohio State Archaeological and Historical Society, 5 vols. (1922-1926), Hayes to Lucy Webb Hayes (October 25, 1864). After the battle of Cedar Creek.)
  • 52.
    I never saw a fatter man; he'd have given my mother a stone or two and not felt the loss. Round as the "o" in rotund.
    (Angela Carter (1940-1992), British postmodern novelist. repr. Black Venus, Chatto & Windus (1985). "The Kitchen Child," p. 97, Vogue (1979).)
    More quotations from: Angela Carter, loss, mother
  • 53.
    The loss of my sight was a great fillip. If I could go deaf and dumb I think I might pant on to be a hundred.
    (Samuel Beckett (1906-1989), Irish dramatist, novelist. First edition, 1958. Mr. Rooney, in "All That Fall," reprinted in Krapp's Last Tape, p. 75, Grove Press (1960).)
    More quotations from: Samuel Beckett, loss
  • 54.
    "Letting go" ...implies generosity, a talent a good mother needs in abundance. Separation is not loss, it is not cutting yourself off from someone you love. It is giving freedom to the other person to be herself before she becomes resentful, stunted, and suffocated by being tied too close. Separation is not the end of love. It creates love.
    (Nancy Friday (20th century), U.S. author. My Mother, My Self, ch. 3 (1977).)
  • 55.
    No entertainment is so cheap as reading, nor any pleasure so lasting. She will not want new fashions nor regret the loss of expensive diversions or variety of company if she can be amused with an author in her closet.
    (Mary Wortley, Lady Montagu (1689-1762), British society figure, letter writer. Letter, June 22, 1752, to her daughter Lady Bute. Selected Letters, ed. Robert Halsband (1970). Advising her on bringing up Lady Bute's own daughter.)
    More quotations from: Lady Montagu, Mary Wortley, loss
  • 56.
    It is an immense loss to have all robust and sustaining expletives refined away from one! At ... moments of trial refinement is a feeble reed to lean upon.
    (Alice James (1848-1892), U.S. diarist, sister of Henry and William James. letter, Dec. 12, 1889, to her brother, psychologist William James. The Diary of Alice James, ed. Leon Edel (1964).)
    More quotations from: Alice James, loss
  • 57.
    Unfortunately, I am involved in a freedom ride protesting the loss of the minority rights belonging to the few remaining earthbound stars. All we demanded was our right to twinkle.
    (Marilyn Monroe (1926-1962), U.S. screen actor. Marilyn: Something's Got to Give (TV program, Channel 4), broadcast (Aug. 2, 1992). Telegram, June 13, 1962, to Mr. and Mrs. Robert Kennedy, turning down a party invitation.)
    More quotations from: Marilyn Monroe, loss, freedom
  • 58.
    The loss of sex polarity is part and parcel of the larger disintegration, the reflex of the soul's death, and coincident with the disappearance of great men, great deeds, great causes, great wars, etc.
    (Henry Miller (1891-1980), U.S. author. "The Universe of Death," The Cosmological Eye (1939).)
    More quotations from: Henry Miller, loss, death
  • 59.
    Let the good service of well-deservers be never rewarded with loss. Let their thanks be such as may encourage more strivers for the like.
    (Elizabeth I (1533-1603), Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 11, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). To Sir Henry Sidney, governor of Ireland.)
    More quotations from: Elizabeth I, thanks, loss
  • 60.
    How miserably things seem to be arranged in this world. If we have no friends, we have no pleasure; and if we have them, we are sure to lose them, and be doubly pained by the loss.
    (Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Joshua F. Speed, Feb. 25, 1842. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 1, p. 281, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).)
    More quotations from: Abraham Lincoln, loss, world
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