Quotations About / On: MARRIAGE

  • 61.
    When undertaking marriage, everyone must be the judge of his own thoughts, and take counsel from himself.
    (François Rabelais (1494-1553), French author, evangelist. Pantagruel to Panurge, in Third Book, ch. 29, p. 444, Pleiade edition (1995). paraphrase of St. Paul's opinion on marriage.)
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  • 62.
    Garth, marriage is punishment for shoplifting, in some countries.
    (Mike Myers (b. 1964), Canadian comic, screenwriter, Bonnie Turner, screenwriter, Terry Turner, screenwriter, and Penelope Spheeris. Wayne Campbell (Mike Myers), in Wayne's World (film) (1992). The movie featured characters created by Mike Myers and developed into a comedy sketch with Dana Carvey on Saturday Night Live (TV show), hosted by David Letterman in 1989.)
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  • 63.
    Unless the law of marriage were first made human, it could never become divine.
    (George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950), Anglo-Irish playwright, critic. (First produced 1908). The Bishop, in Getting Married, The Bodley Head Bernard Shaw: Collected Plays with their Prefaces, vol. 3, ed. Dan H. Laurence (1971).)
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  • 64.
    The best friend will probably get the best spouse, because a good marriage is based on the talent for friendship.
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 2, p. 265, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Human, All-Too-Human, "Woman and Child," aphorism 378, "Friendship and Marriage," (1878).)
  • 65.
    There is, hidden or flaunted, a sword between the sexes till an entire marriage reconciles them.
    (C.S. (Clive Staples) Lewis (1898-1963), British author. A Grief Observed, pt. 3 (1961).)
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  • 66.
    Marriage (in what is called the spiritual world) is impossible, because of the inequality between every subject and every object.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Experience," Essays, Second Series (1844).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, marriage, world
  • 67.
    There is a time for all things—Except Marriage my dear.
    (Thomas Chatterton (1752-1770), British poet. Reply, April 9, 1770, to a note from an admirer who bids him be patient, "for there is a time for all things." The Complete Works of Thomas Chatterton, vol. 1 (1971).)
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  • 68.
    Marriage may often be a stormy lake, but celibacy is almost always a muddy horsepond.
    (Thomas Love Peacock (1785-1866), British author. Melincourt, ch. 7 (1817).)
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  • 69.
    The first breath of adultery is the freest; after it, constraints aping marriage develop.
    (John Updike (b. 1932), U.S. author, critic. Couples, ch. 5 (1968).)
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  • 70.
    There is more of good nature than of good sense at the bottom of most marriages.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Essay on "Love" in letter, September 1852, to Harrison Blake, in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 6, pp. 199-200, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
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