Quotations About / On: MARRIAGE

  • 61.
    As unmarried business women we must constantly use our opportunities in business in such a way that we are prepared for the marriage which may be ours tomorrow.
    (Hortense Odlum (1892-?), U.S. businesswoman. A Woman's Place, ch. 16 (1939). Although highly successful as president of Bonwit Teller, a New York City women's store, Odlum retained a traditional social perspective. She had a wealthy husband, three sons who were partly grown when she took the presidency (which was her first job), a luxurious home, and household help.)
  • 62.
    Marriage is good enough for the lower classes: they have facilities for desertion that are denied to us.
    (George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950), Anglo-Irish playwright, critic. (First produced 1908). Hotchkiss, in Getting Married, The Bodley Head Bernard Shaw: Collected Plays with their Prefaces, vol. 3, ed. Dan H. Laurence (1971).)
    More quotations from: George Bernard Shaw, marriage
  • 63.
    So often, as the septuagenarian reflects on life's rewards, we hear that, "in the final analysis" of money, power, prestige, and marriage, fathering alone was what "mattered."
    (Kyle D. Pruett (20th century), professor, child psychiatrist. The Nurturing Father, ch. 15 (1987).)
  • 64.
    Bring a wife home to your house when you are of the right age, not far short of 30 years, nor much above; this is the right time for marriage.
    (Hesiod (c. 8th century B.C.), Greek didactic poet. Works and Days, 395.)
    More quotations from: Hesiod, marriage, house, home, time
  • 65.
    To seduce a woman famous for strict morals, religious fervour and the happiness of her marriage: what could possibly be more prestigious?
    (Christopher Hampton (b. 1946), British playwright. Valmont, in Dangerous Liaisons (1989).)
  • 66.
    Marriage, for a woman at least, hampers the two things that made life to me glorious—friendship and learning.
    (Jane Harrison (1850-1928), British classical scholar, writer. "Conclusion," Reminiscences of a Student's Life (1925).)
    More quotations from: Jane Harrison, marriage, woman, life
  • 67.
    Any intelligent woman who reads the marriage contract and then goes into it, deserves all the consequences.
    (Isadora Duncan (1878-1927), U.S. dancer. My Life, ch. 19 (1927).)
    More quotations from: Isadora Duncan, marriage, woman
  • 68.
    A man's love, till it has been chastened and fastened by the feeling of duty which marriage brings with it, is instigated mainly by the difficulty of pursuit.
    (Anthony Trollope (1815-1882), British novelist. The American Senator, vol. 3, ch. xl, London, Chapman and Hall (1877).)
    More quotations from: Anthony Trollope, marriage, love
  • 69.
    Every married man is in danger of being cuckolded. Cuckoldry is naturally one of the prerogatives of marriage.
    (François Rabelais (1494-1553), French author, evangelist. Doctor Rondibilis to Panurge, in Third Book, ch. 32, p. 453, Pleiade edition (1995).)
    More quotations from: François Rabelais, marriage
  • 70.
    Woman, or more precisely put, perhaps, marriage, is the representative of life with which you are meant to come to terms.
    (Franz Kafka (1883-1924), Prague German Jewish author, novelist. The Fourth Notebook, February 23, 1918. The Blue Octavo Notebooks, ed. Max Brod, trans. by Ernst Kaiser and Eithne Wilkins. Exact Change, Cambridge, MA (1991). Dearest Father: Stories and Other Writings, trans. by Ernst Kaiser and Eithne Wilkins, New York, Schocken Books (1954).)
    More quotations from: Franz Kafka, marriage, woman, life
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