Quotations About / On: MOON

  • 11.
    Oh, Jerry, don't let's ask for the moon—we have the stars.
    (Casey Robinson, screenwriter. Irving Rapper. Charlotte Vale (Bette Davis), in Now, Voyager (film) (1950). The movie's title is taken from Walt Whitman's Leaves of Grass.)
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  • 12.
    Then they seen it, the old Missouri River shinin' in the moon and across it the lights of St. Louis.
    (Dudley Nichols (1895-1960), U.S. screenwriter, and Howard Hawks. Narrator (uncredited), The Big Sky, Jim Deakins (Kirk Douglas) and his companions, Zeb Calloway (Arthur Hunnicut) and Boone Caudell (Dewey Martin), approach the Missouri River (1952). From The Novel by A.P. Gu.)
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  • 13.
    Wine and cheese are ageless companions, like aspirin and aches, or June and moon, or good people and noble ventures ...
    (M.F.K. Fisher (1908-1992), U.S. culinary writer and autobiographer. Vin et Fromage, Introduction (1981). In English, the title of this book (which was written and published in the United States) is "Wine and Cheese." The book's authors are Marylou Scavarda and Kate Sater.)
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  • 14.
    Moons and years pass by and are gone forever, but a beautiful moment shimmers through life a ray of light.
    (Franz Grillparzer (1791-1872), Austrian author. "Into the Album of Two Adorable Cousins in Villach," Poems (1819).)
  • 15.
    Look not into the sun! Even the moon is too bright for your nocturnal eyes!
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 10, p. 196, selection 5[1], number 81, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Unpublished fragments dating to November 1882February 1883. Originally meant to be attributed to Zarathustra in Thus Spoke Zarathustra.)
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  • 16.
    These late eclipses in the sun and moon portend no good to us.
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Gloucester, in King Lear, act 1, sc. 2, l. 103-4. "Late" means recent.)
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  • 17.
    We make guilty of our disasters the sun, the moon, and stars, as if we were villains on necessity, fools by heavenly compulsion.
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Edmund, in King Lear, act 1, sc. 2, l. 120-2. "On" means by.)
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  • 18.
    One piece of good sense would be more memorable than a monument as high as the moon.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 64, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
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  • 19.
    Moons are no more bounds to spiritual power than bat-balls.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Circles," Essays, First Series (1841, repr. 1847). Emerson is speaking here about the illusion of permanence and connecting the idea of flux to the non-empirical realm of spirituality. The notion is that spiritual power blooms in the context of change and mutability. If all were permanently stable, Emerson argues, the sacred would not be able to appear in nature. Moons in the solar system and earthly balls dancing off the end of a bat represent the spectrum of possibility in the universe.)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, power
  • 20.
    I'll meet you tonight under the moon. Oh, I can see you now—you and the moon. You wear a neck-tie so I'll know you.
    (Morrie Ryskind, U.S. screenwriter, Robert Florey, and Joseph Santley. Mr. Hammer (Groucho Marx), The Cocoanuts, trying to make love to the wealthy Mrs. Potter (Margaret Dumont) (1929). Ryskind adapted this film from original Broadway play by George Kaufman.)
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