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Quotations About / On: MOON

  • 21.
    These late eclipses in the sun and moon portend no good to us.
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Gloucester, in King Lear, act 1, sc. 2, l. 103-4. "Late" means recent.)
    More quotations from: William Shakespeare, moon, sun
  • 22.
    We make guilty of our disasters the sun, the moon, and stars, as if we were villains on necessity, fools by heavenly compulsion.
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Edmund, in King Lear, act 1, sc. 2, l. 120-2. "On" means by.)
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  • 23.
    One piece of good sense would be more memorable than a monument as high as the moon.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 64, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, moon
  • 24.
    Moons are no more bounds to spiritual power than bat-balls.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Circles," Essays, First Series (1841, repr. 1847). Emerson is speaking here about the illusion of permanence and connecting the idea of flux to the non-empirical realm of spirituality. The notion is that spiritual power blooms in the context of change and mutability. If all were permanently stable, Emerson argues, the sacred would not be able to appear in nature. Moons in the solar system and earthly balls dancing off the end of a bat represent the spectrum of possibility in the universe.)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, power
  • 25.
    I'll meet you tonight under the moon. Oh, I can see you now—you and the moon. You wear a neck-tie so I'll know you.
    (Morrie Ryskind, U.S. screenwriter, Robert Florey, and Joseph Santley. Mr. Hammer (Groucho Marx), The Cocoanuts, trying to make love to the wealthy Mrs. Potter (Margaret Dumont) (1929). Ryskind adapted this film from original Broadway play by George Kaufman.)
    More quotations from: Morrie Ryskind, moon
  • 26.
    All I want is the moon, Helicon. I know in advance what will kill me. I have not yet exhausted all that can make me live. That is why I want the moon.
    (Albert Camus (1913-1960), French-Algerian novelist, dramatist, philosopher. Gallimard (1958). Caligula in Caligula, act 3, sc. 3, Pléiade (1962).)
    More quotations from: Albert Camus, moon
  • 27.
    War talk by men who have been in a war is always interesting; whereas moon talk by a poet who has not been in the moon is likely to be dull.
    (Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. Life on the Mississippi, ch. 45 (1883).)
  • 28.
    My pillow is as good as any ocean
    to drown in the nightmare of myself.
    I swam all the way here from the moon.
    (I Liked You When I Thought I was Dead)
    More quotations from: Casey Renee Kiser
  • 29.
    You will not always be on this earth so while you are here make the most of it.
    The moon and the stars are not mine to give but I will love you and be yours as long as we both shall live.
    (no one)
    More quotations from: janine Blair
  • 30.
    Over the mountains of the moon, down the valley of the shadow. Ride, boldly ride, the shade replied, in search of El Dorado.
    (Leigh Brackett (1915-1978), U.S. screenwriter, and From The Novel The St. Howard Hawks. Mississippi/Alan Bourdillon Traherne (James Caan), El Dorado, line of poetry that Mississippi recites throughout the film (1966). The dialogue is based on the poem "Eldorado," by Edgar Allen Poe.)
    More quotations from: Leigh Brackett, moon
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