Quotations About / On: MOON

  • 31.
    Look not into the sun! Even the moon is too bright for your nocturnal eyes!
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 10, p. 196, selection 5[1], number 81, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Unpublished fragments dating to November 1882February 1883. Originally meant to be attributed to Zarathustra in Thus Spoke Zarathustra.)
    More quotations from: Friedrich Nietzsche, moon, sun
  • 32.
    There is something haunting in the light of the moon; it has all the dispassionateness of a disembodied soul, and something of its inconceivable mystery.
    (Joseph Conrad (1857-1924), Polish-born British novelist. Marlow, in Lord Jim, ch. 24 (1900).)
    More quotations from: Joseph Conrad, moon, light
  • 33.
    The Mississippi, the Ganges, and the Nile,... the Rocky Mountains, the Himmaleh, and Mountains of the Moon, have a kind of personal importance in the annals of the world.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 10, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, moon, world
  • 34.
    It takes place ... always without permanent form, though ancient and familiar as the sun and moon, and as sure to come again.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, pp. 277-278, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, moon, sun
  • 35.
    Most events recorded in history are more remarkable than important, like eclipses of the sun and moon, by which all are attracted, but whose effects no one takes the trouble to calculate.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 134, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
  • 36.
    The very dogs that sullenly bay the moon from farm-yards in these nights excite more heroism in our breasts than all the civil exhortations or war sermons of the age.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 40, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, moon, war
  • 37.
    ... the first step of the terrible journey toward feeling somebody should act, that ends in utter confusion and hopelessness, east of the sun and west of the moon.
    (John Ashbery (b. 1927), U.S. poet, critic. "For John Clare.")
    More quotations from: John Ashbery, journey, moon, sun
  • 38.
    We make guilty of our disasters the sun, the moon, and stars, as if we were villains on necessity, fools by heavenly compulsion.
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Edmund, in King Lear, act 1, sc. 2, l. 120-2. "On" means by.)
    More quotations from: William Shakespeare, moon, sun
  • 39.
    One piece of good sense would be more memorable than a monument as high as the moon.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 64, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, moon
  • 40.
    For I could not read or speak and on the long nights I could not turn the moon off or count the lights of cars across the ceiling.
    (Anne Sexton (1928-1974), U.S. poet. "Fourth Psalm.")
    More quotations from: Anne Sexton, moon
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