Quotations About / On: MOON

  • 41.
    The very dogs that sullenly bay the moon from farm-yards in these nights excite more heroism in our breasts than all the civil exhortations or war sermons of the age.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 40, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, moon, war
  • 42.
    ... the first step of the terrible journey toward feeling somebody should act, that ends in utter confusion and hopelessness, east of the sun and west of the moon.
    (John Ashbery (b. 1927), U.S. poet, critic. "For John Clare.")
    More quotations from: John Ashbery, journey, moon, sun
  • 43.
    We make guilty of our disasters the sun, the moon, and stars, as if we were villains on necessity, fools by heavenly compulsion.
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Edmund, in King Lear, act 1, sc. 2, l. 120-2. "On" means by.)
    More quotations from: William Shakespeare, moon, sun
  • 44.
    One piece of good sense would be more memorable than a monument as high as the moon.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 64, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, moon
  • 45.
    For I could not read or speak and on the long nights I could not turn the moon off or count the lights of cars across the ceiling.
    (Anne Sexton (1928-1974), U.S. poet. "Fourth Psalm.")
    More quotations from: Anne Sexton, moon
  • 46.
    Let men say we be men of good government, being governed, as the sea is, by our noble and chaste mistress the moon, under whose countenance we steal.
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Falstaff, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 1, sc. 2, l. 28-9. Wittily claiming to be well-behaved ("of good government"), under Diana, goddess of chastity and the moon, while planning a robbery by night.)
    More quotations from: William Shakespeare, moon, sea
  • 47.
    I'll meet you tonight under the moon. Oh, I can see you now—you and the moon. You wear a neck-tie so I'll know you.
    (Morrie Ryskind, U.S. screenwriter, Robert Florey, and Joseph Santley. Mr. Hammer (Groucho Marx), The Cocoanuts, trying to make love to the wealthy Mrs. Potter (Margaret Dumont) (1929). Ryskind adapted this film from original Broadway play by George Kaufman.)
    More quotations from: Morrie Ryskind, moon
  • 48.
    All I want is the moon, Helicon. I know in advance what will kill me. I have not yet exhausted all that can make me live. That is why I want the moon.
    (Albert Camus (1913-1960), French-Algerian novelist, dramatist, philosopher. Gallimard (1958). Caligula in Caligula, act 3, sc. 3, Pléiade (1962).)
    More quotations from: Albert Camus, moon
  • 49.
    In the grand scheme of things, there must be an explanation to the arrangement of the cosmos, the sun, the galaxies, the stars, planets and their continued journeys around or past each other and without a collision or 'accident'. A deity must be somewhere up there or below, who is looking at us secretly and watching every move we make and using some genius method to let the moons spin around planets, planets around the sun and holding the sun in the vastness of space.
    (Existence of a Deity)
    More quotations from: julius lenjatin
  • 50.
    As the longfingered sun reaches out to touch a cloistered trillium or a lake trembles in the light of moon and stars so can a poet's long rainbow of words play our heartstrings from afar.
    (Saiom Shriver)
    More quotations from: Saiom Shriver
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