Quotations About / On: MUSIC

  • 31.
    When you are listening to music it is better to cover your eyes than your ears.
    (José Bergamín (1895-1983), Spanish writer. El cohete y la estrella (The Rocket and the Star), p. 42, Madrid, Biblioteca de Indice (1923).)
    More quotations from: José Bergamín, music
  • 32.
    Good music is very close to primitive language.
    (Denis Diderot (1713-1784), French philosopher. repr. In Selected Writings, ed. Lester G. Crocker (1966). "Correspondence of Ideas with the Motion of Organs," Elements of Physiology (written 1774-1780, published 1875).)
    More quotations from: Denis Diderot, music
  • 33.
    Through music the passions enjoy themselves.
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 5, p. 92, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Beyond Good and Evil, "Fourth Part: Maxims and Interludes," section 106 (1886).)
    More quotations from: Friedrich Nietzsche, music
  • 34.
    Hell is full of musical amateurs: music is the brandy of the damned.
    (George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950), Anglo-Irish playwright, critic. Don Juan, in Man and Superman, act 3.)
    More quotations from: George Bernard Shaw, music
  • 35.
    Music dissolves the straight and narrow.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Twelfth Selection, New York (1993).)
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  • 36.
    In memory everything seems to happen to music.
    (Tennessee Williams (1914-1983), U.S. dramatist. Tom, in The Glass Menagerie, sc. 1 (1944).)
    More quotations from: Tennessee Williams, memory, music
  • 37.
    There is nothing stable in the world; uproar's your only music.
    (John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. letter, Jan. 13-19, 1818, to his brothers George and Thomas Keats. Letters of John Keats, no. 37, ed. Frederick Page (1954).)
    More quotations from: John Keats, music, world
  • 38.
    Nothing is capable of being well set to music that is not nonsense.
    (Joseph Addison (1672-1719), British essayist. Spectator (London, March 21, 1711), no. 18. On the effect of Italian opera on the English stage.)
    More quotations from: Joseph Addison, music
  • 39.
    Music and Wine are one.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Bacchus," Poems (1847).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, music
  • 40.
    Music was invented to confirm human loneliness.
    (Lawrence Durrell (1912-1990), British author. Clea, in Clea, ch. 1, sct. 4 (1960).)
    More quotations from: Lawrence Durrell, music
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