Treasure Island

Quotations About / On: NATURE

  • 51.
    We are by nature observers, and thereby learners. That is our permanent state.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Love," Essays, First Series (1841, repr. 1847).)
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  • 52.
    So long as a man-of-war exists, it must ever remain a picture of much that is tyrannical and repelling in human nature.
    (Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. White-Jacket (1850), ch. 49, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 5, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1969).)
    More quotations from: Herman Melville, war, nature
  • 53.
    A man of thought must feel the thought that is parent of the universe: that the masses of nature do undulate and flow.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Montaigne; or, the Skeptic," Representative Men (1850).)
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  • 54.
    Nature has given women so much power that the law has very wisely given them little.
    (Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. letter, Aug. 18, 1763. The Letters of Samuel Johnson, vol. 1, no. 157, ed. R.W. Chapman (1952).)
    More quotations from: Samuel Johnson, power, women, nature
  • 55.
    In the planting of the seeds of most trees, the best gardeners do no more than follow Nature, though they may not know it.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "The Succession of Forest Trees" (1860), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 5, p. 197, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, nature
  • 56.
    The imagination, give it the least license, dives deeper and soars higher than Nature goes.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 318, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
  • 57.
    This house was designed and constructed with the freedom of stroke of a forester's axe, without other compass and square than Nature uses.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Chesuncook" (1858) in The Maine Woods (1864), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 3, p. 139, Houghton Mifflin (1906). Thoreau refers to a log cabin in the Maine woods.)
  • 58.
    As a means of contrast with the sublime, the grotesque is, in our view, the richest source that nature can offer.
    (Victor Hugo (1802-1885), French poet, novelist, playwright, essayist. Trans. by William G. Allen. Cromwell, preface (1827).)
    More quotations from: Victor Hugo, nature
  • 59.
    If a plant cannot live according to its nature, it dies; and so a man.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Civil Disobedience," originally published as "Resistance to Civil Government" (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 4, p. 376, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, nature
  • 60.
    The boxer's ring is the enjoyment of the part of society whose animal nature alone has been developed.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Speech given to the American Peace Society, Boston, Massachusetts. "War," (1838).)
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