Quotations About / On: NATURE

  • 61.
    Use almost can change the stamp of nature.
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 3, sc. 4, l. 168. Proverbial; "stamp of nature" means innate characteristics.)
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  • 62.
    Searching nature I taste self but at one tankard, that of my own being.
    (Gerard Manley Hopkins (1844-1889), British poet, Jesuit priest. Comments on the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius Loyola. Poems and Prose of Gerard Manley Hopkins, ed. W.H. Gardner (1953).)
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  • 63.
    It is Nature's own bird which lives on buds and diet-drink.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 305, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
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  • 64.
    How meanly and grossly do we deal with nature!
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Paradise (To Be) Regained" (1843), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 4, p. 284, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
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  • 65.
    Philosophically considered, the universe is composed of Nature and the Soul.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Nature, Introduction (1836, revised and repr. 1849). Emerson goes on to explain that by "nature" he means everything that is "not me," hence not only the trees and the sun and the moon, but other people, art, as well as one's own body. This formulation with its Cartesian echoes becomes articulated in more acrimonious (and ironic) terms in the essay "Self-Reliance," when Emerson writes: "Man is timid and apologetic; he is no longer upright; he dares not say 'I think,' 'I am,' but quotes some saint or sage." The saint or sage is, of course, Descartes.)
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  • 66.
    For even bold natures flee, whenever they see Hades close to life.
    (Sophocles (497-406/5 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Antigone, l. 580.)
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  • 67.
    All is disgust when a man leaves his own nature and does what is unfit.
    (Sophocles (497-406/5 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Philoctetes, l. 902.)
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  • 68.
    The nature of bad news infects the teller.
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Messenger, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 1, sc. 2, l. 95.)
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  • 69.
    Nature is, after all, the only book that offers important content on every page.
    (Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749-1832), German poet, dramatist. Italian Journey, part I, Naples, March 9, 1787 (1817).)
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  • 70.
    We know more from nature than we can at will communicate.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Nature, ch. 4 (1836, revised and repr. 1849).)
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