Treasure Island

Quotations About / On: OCEAN

  • 21.
    Those who want to row on the ocean of human knowledge do not get far, and the storm drives those out of their course who set sail.
    (Franz Grillparzer (1791-1872), Austrian author. Notebooks and Diaries (1819).)
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  • 22.
    The unconscious is the ocean of the unsayable, of what has been expelled from the land of language, removed as a result of ancient prohibitions.
    (Italo Calvino (1923-1985), Italian author, critic. lecture, delivered in Turin, Nov. 1969. "Cybernetics and Ghosts," published in The Literature Machine (1987).)
    More quotations from: Italo Calvino, ocean
  • 23.
    There is no sea more dangerous than the ocean of practical politics—none in which there is more need of good pilotage and of a single, unfaltering purpose when the waves rise high.
    (Thomas Henry Huxley (1825-1895), British biologist. Published in Collected Essays, vol. 1 (1893). "On the Natural Inequality of Men," (1890).)
    More quotations from: Thomas Henry Huxley, ocean, sea
  • 24.
    There is no sea more dangerous than the ocean of practical politics—none in which there is more need of good pilotage and of a single, unfaltering purpose when the waves rise high.
    (Thomas Henry Huxley (1825-95), British biologist and educator. Reflection #41, Aphorisms and Reflections, selected by Henrietta A. Huxley, Macmillan (London, 1907).)
    More quotations from: Thomas Henry Huxley, ocean, sea
  • 25.
    I seem to have been only like a boy playing on the seashore, and diverting myself in now and then finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell than ordinary, whilst the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me.
    (Isaac Newton (1642-1727), British mathematician, physicist. Memoirs of Newton, vol. 2, ch. 27, ed. David Brewster (1855).)
    More quotations from: Isaac Newton, ocean, truth
  • 26.
    All rivers, even the most dazzling, those that catch the sun in their course, all rivers go down to the ocean and drown. And life awaits man as the sea awaits the river.
    (Simone Schwarz-Bart (b. 1938), Gaudeloupean author. The Bridge of Beyond, p. 81, Éditions du Seuil.)
  • 27.
    To believe her limited in range because she was harmonious in method is as sensible as to imagine that when the Atlantic Ocean is as smooth as a mill-pond it shrinks to the size of a mill-pond.
    (Rebecca West (1892-1983), British author. The Strange Necessity, ch. 6 (1928). Of Jane Austen (1775-1817), a great British novelist whose work has sometimes been criticized as limited.)
  • 28.
    It is terrible to die of thirst on the ocean. Do you have to salt your truth so heavily that it no longer—quenches thirst?
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 5, p. 89, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Beyond Good and Evil, "Fourth Part: Maxims and Interludes," section 81 (1886).)
    More quotations from: Friedrich Nietzsche, ocean, truth
  • 29.
    I don't see America as a mainland, but as a sea, a big ocean. Sometimes a storm arises, a formidable current develops, and it seems it will engulf everything. Wait a moment, another current will appear and bring the first one to naught.
    (Jacques Maritain (1882-1973), French philosopher. Reflections on America, ch. 4 (1948).)
  • 30.
    Who heeds the waste abyss of possibility? The ocean is everywhere the same, but it has no character until seen with the shore or the ship.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Speech, August 11, 1841, at Waterville College, Maine before the Society of the Adelphi. "The Method of Nature," Nature, Addresses, and Lectures (1849).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, ocean
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