Treasure Island

Quotations About / On: OCEAN

  • 31.
    A great proportion of the inhabitants of the Cape are always thus abroad about their teaming on some ocean highway or other, and the history of one of their ordinary trips would cast the Argonautic expedition into the shade.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Cape Cod (1855-1865), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 4, pp. 140-141, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, ocean, history
  • 32.
    He winged away on a wildgoup's chase across the kathartic ocean and made synthetic ink and sensitive paper for his own end out of his wit's waste.
    (James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Finnegans Wake, Part I, section vi, Penguin (1976). Of the artist in exile.)
    More quotations from: James Joyce, ocean
  • 33.
    Love (understood as the desire of good for another) is in fact so unnatural a phenomenon that it can scarcely repeat itself, the soul being unable to become virgin again and not having energy enough to cast itself out again into the ocean of another's soul.
    (James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Exiles, notes (written 1914-1915, published 1952).)
    More quotations from: James Joyce, ocean, love
  • 34.
    My spirits infallibly rise in proportion to the outward dreariness. Give me the ocean, the desert, or the wilderness!
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Walking" (1862), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 5, p. 228, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, ocean
  • 35.
    A hermitage in the forest is the refuge of the narrow-minded misanthrope; a hammock on the ocean is the asylum for the generous distressed.
    (Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Israel Potter (1855), ch. 2, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 8, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1982).)
    More quotations from: Herman Melville, ocean, forest
  • 36.
    Before the land rose out of the ocean, and became dry land, chaos reigned; and between high and low water mark, where she is partially disrobed and rising, a sort of chaos reigns still, which only anomalous creatures can inhabit.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Cape Cod (1855-1865), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 4, p. 71, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
  • 37.
    Again we took to the beach for another day (October 13), walking along the shore of the resounding sea, determined to get it into us. We wished to associate with the ocean until it lost the pond-like look which it wears to a countryman.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Cape Cod (1855-1865), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 4, p. 177, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
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