Quotations About / On: OCEAN

  • 31.
    Mind is a moving ocean and a flying sky. This wanders with many vibrations coming in contact of material desires. But we need to learn the art of stabilizing this by practice of meditation.
    (Mind and Waves)
    More quotations from: Kumarmani Mahakul
  • 32.
    'I searched the highest mountain and the bottom of the ocean for fragments of me that had been casted aside, to no avail. The harder I searched, the more I became isolated from self and filled with despair. That's when I realized, the fragments of me also need to be heard, and that our healing was in different stages, which caused great chaos within. That viewing them as a curse instead of a system of survival would not help the healing process, that acceptance, patience and gentleness were the essentials for healing to begin and that in time we'd heal as a whole.'
    (Mental Health, Dissociative Identity Disorder, PTSD, Fragments, Healing from Trauma, New Beginnings.)
    More quotations from: Annalee Hopkins Somerville
  • 33.
    Let my style capture all the sounds of my time. This should make it an annoyance to my contemporaries. But later generations should hold it to their ears like a seashell in which there is the music of an ocean of mud.
    (Karl Kraus (1874-1936), Austrian writer. Trans. by Harry Zohn, originally published in Beim Wort genommen (1955). Half-Truths and One-and-a-Half Truths, University of Chicago Press (1990).)
    More quotations from: Karl Kraus, ocean, music, time
  • 34.
    ... for the modern soul, for which it is mere child's play to bridge oceans and continents, there is nothing so impossible as to find the contact with the souls dwelling just around the corner.
    (Robert Musil (1880-1942), Austrian author. repr. Perigee (1980). The Man Without Qualities, book I, part 2, ch. 55, trans. and with a foreword by Eithne Wilkins and Ernst Kaiser, Coward-McCann (1953).)
    More quotations from: Robert Musil, child
  • 35.
    ... the ocean could not be swept back with a broom. The truth was out. It illuminated the world. Motherhood no longer cringed before the relentless laws of fecundity.
    (Margaret Sanger (1879-1966), U.S. birth control advocate. My Fight for Birth Control, ch. 21 (1931). On her success, in 1922, in obtaining New York State incorporation for the American Birth Control League. Sanger was President of the League.)
    More quotations from: Margaret Sanger, ocean, truth, world
  • 36.
    There is no sea more dangerous than the ocean of practical politics—none in which there is more need of good pilotage and of a single, unfaltering purpose when the waves rise high.
    (Thomas Henry Huxley (1825-1895), British biologist. Published in Collected Essays, vol. 1 (1893). "On the Natural Inequality of Men," (1890).)
    More quotations from: Thomas Henry Huxley, ocean, sea
  • 37.
    There is no sea more dangerous than the ocean of practical politics—none in which there is more need of good pilotage and of a single, unfaltering purpose when the waves rise high.
    (Thomas Henry Huxley (1825-95), British biologist and educator. Reflection #41, Aphorisms and Reflections, selected by Henrietta A. Huxley, Macmillan (London, 1907).)
    More quotations from: Thomas Henry Huxley, ocean, sea
  • 38.
    I seem to have been only like a boy playing on the seashore, and diverting myself in now and then finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell than ordinary, whilst the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me.
    (Isaac Newton (1642-1727), British mathematician, physicist. Memoirs of Newton, vol. 2, ch. 27, ed. David Brewster (1855).)
    More quotations from: Isaac Newton, ocean, truth
  • 39.
    All rivers, even the most dazzling, those that catch the sun in their course, all rivers go down to the ocean and drown. And life awaits man as the sea awaits the river.
    (Simone Schwarz-Bart (b. 1938), Gaudeloupean author. The Bridge of Beyond, p. 81, Éditions du Seuil.)
  • 40.
    To believe her limited in range because she was harmonious in method is as sensible as to imagine that when the Atlantic Ocean is as smooth as a mill-pond it shrinks to the size of a mill-pond.
    (Rebecca West (1892-1983), British author. The Strange Necessity, ch. 6 (1928). Of Jane Austen (1775-1817), a great British novelist whose work has sometimes been criticized as limited.)
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