Quotations About / On: PAIN

  • 71.
    Genius lasts longer than Beauty. That accounts for the fact that we all take such pains to over-educate ourselves.
    (Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Grey, ch. 1 (1891).)
    More quotations from: Oscar Wilde, beauty
  • 72.
    There are minds so impatient of inferiority that their gratitude is a species of revenge, and they return benefits, not because recompense is a pleasure, but because obligation is a pain.
    (Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. repr. in Works of Samuel Johnson, Yale Edition, vol. 4, eds. W.J. Bate and Albrecht B. Strauss (1969). quoted in Rambler (Jan. 15, 1751), no. 87.)
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  • 73.
    Pain is as diverse as man. One suffers as one can.
    (Victor Hugo (1802-1885), French poet, novelist, playwright, essayist. Trans. by Lorenzo O'Rourke. "Thoughts," Postscriptum de ma vie, in Victor Hugo's Intellectual Autobiography, Funk and Wagnalls (1907).)
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  • 74.
    I never knew a writer yet who took the smallest pains with his style and was at the same time readable.
    (Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 290, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).)
    More quotations from: Samuel Butler, time
  • 75.
    Violence stops thought. Hence its popularity as a pain-killer.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Third Selection, New York (1986).)
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  • 76.
    Old age is a tyrant that forbids us upon pain of death all the pleasures of youth.
    (François, Duc De La Rochefoucauld (1613-1680), French writer, moralist. repr. F.A. Stokes Co., New York (c. 1930). Moral Maxims and Reflections, no. 461 (1665-1678), trans. London (1706).)
  • 77.
    Prostitutes have very improperly been styled women of pleasure; they are women of pain, or sorrow, of grief, of bitter and continual repentance, without a hope of obtaining a pardon.
    (Anonymous, U.S. women's magazine contributor. Weekly Visitor or Ladies Miscellany, p. 85 (January 1804).)
  • 78.
    There is no more lively sensation than that of pain; its impressions are certain and dependable, they never deceive as may those of the pleasure women perpetually feign and almost never experience.
    (Marquis de Sade (1740-1814), French author. Clément, in Justine, ou les Malheurs de la Vertu (1791).)
    More quotations from: Marquis de Sade, pain, women
  • 79.
    Be assured that it gives much more pain to the mind to be in debt, than to do without any article whatever which we may seem to want.
    (Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), U.S. president. Letter, June 14, 1787, to his daughter, Martha Jefferson0s0. The Family Letters of Thomas Jefferson, p. 43, eds. E.M. Betts and J.A. Bear, Jr. (1966).)
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  • 80.
    Skilled workers historically have been ambivalent toward automation, knowing that the bodies it would augment or replace were the occasion for both their pain and their power.
    (Shoshana Zuboff (b. 1951), U.S. social scientist. In the Age of the Smart Machine, ch. 1 (1988).)
    More quotations from: Shoshana Zuboff, pain, power
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