Treasure Island

Quotations About / On: PAIN

  • 71.
    Hush! Check those words. Do not cure ill with ill and make your pain still heavier than it is.
    (Sophocles (497-406/5 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Ajax, l. 362.)
    More quotations from: Sophocles, pain
  • 72.
    A man, to be greatly good, must imagine intensely and comprehensively; he must put himself in the place of another and of many others; the pains and pleasures of his species must become his own.
    (Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. A Defence of Poetry (written 1821, publ. 1840).)
    More quotations from: Percy Bysshe Shelley, imagine
  • 73.
    There is something terribly morbid in the modern sympathy with pain. One should sympathise with the colour, the beauty, the joy of life. The less said about life's sores the better.
    (Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 3 (1891).)
  • 74.
    Surrounded as we are by the wants and woes of our fellow-men, and yet given to follow our own pleasures, regardless of their pains, are we not like people sitting up with a corpse, and making merry in the house of the dead?
    (Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Redburn (1849), ch. 37, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 4, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1969).)
    More quotations from: Herman Melville, house, people
  • 75.
    It is commonly said by farmers, that a good pear or apple costs no more time or pains to rear, than a poor one; so I would have no work of art, no speech, or action, or thought, or friend, but the best.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Nominalist and Realist," Essays, Second Series (1844).)
  • 76.
    I wonder, among all the tangles of this mortal coil, which one contains tighter knots to undo, & consequently suggests more tugging, & pain, & diversified elements of misery, than the marriage tie.
    (Edith Wharton (1862-1937), U.S. author. letter, Feb. 12, 1909. The Letters of Edith Wharton (1988).)
    More quotations from: Edith Wharton, marriage, pain
  • 77.
    Shall we with pains erect a heaven of blue glass over ourselves, though when it is done we shall be sure to gaze still at the true ethereal heaven far above, as if the former were not?
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 359, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, heaven, blue
  • 78.
    How miserably things seem to be arranged in this world. If we have no friends, we have no pleasure; and if we have them, we are sure to lose them, and be doubly pained by the loss.
    (Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Joshua F. Speed, Feb. 25, 1842. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 1, p. 281, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).)
    More quotations from: Abraham Lincoln, loss, world
  • 79.
    Pain is superficial, and therefore fear is. The torments of martyrdoms are probably most keenly felt by the by-standers.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Courage," Society and Solitude (1870).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, pain, fear
  • 80.
    Hope is itself a species of happiness, and, perhaps, the chief happiness which this world affords: but, like all other pleasures immoderately enjoyed, the excesses of hope must be expiated by pain; and expectations improperly indulged must end in disappointment.
    (Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Letter, June 8, 1762. Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson (1791).)
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