Quotations About / On: POEM

  • 1.
    Our poems will have failed if our readers are not brought by them beyond the poems.
    (Muriel Rukeyser (1913-1980), U.S. poet. The Life of Poetry, ch. 5 (1949).)
    More quotations from: Muriel Rukeyser
  • 2.
    Title deeds generally outlast poems.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Seventh Selection, New York (1990).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley
  • 3.
    Poetry has no goal other than itself; it can have no other, and no poem will be so great, so noble, so truly worthy of the name of poem, than one written uniquely for the pleasure of writing a poem.
    (Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. "New Notes on Edgar Poe," part IV (1859).)
    More quotations from: Charles Baudelaire, poem, poetry
  • 4.
    Sometimes I feel that the historic references and the images I upload (later on when I have written my poems) undermine them.
    (Charu Gandhi. On poem 'The Passing')
    More quotations from: Sadiqullah Khan
  • 5.
    No poems can please for long or live that are written by water-drinkers.
    (Horace [Quintus Horatius Flaccus] (65-8 B.C.), Roman poet. Epistles, bk. 1, epistle 19, l. 2 (22-8 B.C.).)
  • 6.
    The grand style is available now only in old poems, museums, and parodies.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Fourth Selection, New York (1987).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley
  • 7.
    It's easy to understand why the most beautiful poems about England in the spring were written by poets living in Italy at the time.
    (Philip Dunne (1908-1992), U.S. screenwriter. Joseph L. Mankiewicz. Miles Fairley (George Sanders), The Ghost and Mrs. Muir, to Mrs. Muir during a spring shower (1947). From the novel by R.A. Dick.)
  • 8.
    It's easy to understand why the most beautiful poems about England in the spring were written by poets living in Italy at the time.
    (Philip Dunne (1908-1992), U.S. screenwriter, and Joseph L. Mankiewicz. Miles Fairley (George Sanders), The Ghost and Mrs. Muir (1947). To Mrs. Muir during a spring shower. From the novel by R.A. Dick.)
  • 9.
    A poem is good until one knows by whom it is.
    (Karl Kraus (1874-1936), Austrian writer. Trans. by Harry Zohn, originally published in Beim Wort genommen (1955). Half-Truths and One-and-a-Half Truths, University of Chicago Press (1990).)
    More quotations from: Karl Kraus, poem
  • 10.
    Often in winter the end of the day is like the final metaphor in a poem celebrating death: there is no way out.
    (Agustin Gomez-Arcos (b. 1939), Spanish author. A Bird Burned Alive, ch. 1 (1988).)
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