Treasure Island

Quotations About / On: POEM

  • 21.
    Women are not supposed to have uteruses, especially in poems.
    (Maxine Kumin (b. 1925), U.S. poet and feminist. As quoted in Women's Studies, p. 135 (1976). On the restrictions on poetry's subject matter due to male editors' dismissal of peculiarly "female" topics.)
    More quotations from: Maxine Kumin, women
  • 22.
    The United States themselves are essentially the greatest poem.
    (Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. Leaves of Grass, preface (1855).)
    More quotations from: Walt Whitman, poem
  • 23.
    In every good poem everything must be both deliberate and instinctive. That is how the poem becomes ideal.
    (Friedrich Von Schlegel (1772-1829), German philosopher. Aphorism 23 in Selected Aphorisms from the Lyceum (1797), translated by Ernst Behler and Roman Struc, Dialogue on Poetry and Literary Aphorisms, Pennsylvania University Press (1968).)
    More quotations from: Friedrich Von Schlegel, poem
  • 24.
    To declaim freedom verses seems like a poem within a poem; freedom requires guns, it requires arms, but no feet.
    (Franz Grillparzer (1791-1872), Austrian author. Poems (1842).)
    More quotations from: Franz Grillparzer, poem, freedom
  • 25.
    Only truthful hands write true poems. I cannot see any basic difference between a handshake and a poem.
    (Paul Celan [Paul Antschel] (1920-1970), Austrian poet. Trans. 1986, Carcanet (1986). Collected Prose, letter to Hans Bender (1961).)
    More quotations from: Paul Celan [Paul Antschel], poem
  • 26.
    What would we not give for some great poem to read now, which would be in harmony with the scenery,—for if men read aright, methinks they would never read anything but poems. No history nor philosophy can supply their place.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 93, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, poem, history
  • 27.
    Let us dismiss, as irrelevant to the poem per se, the circumstance ... which, in the first place, gave rise to the intention of composing a poem that should suit at once the popular and the critical taste.
    (Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. "The Philosophy of Composition," Graham's Magazine (1846). Disingenuously dismissing private motives.)
    More quotations from: Edgar Allan Poe, poem
  • 28.
    Just as a child is really a thing that wants to become a man, so is the poem an object of nature that wants to become an object of art.
    (Friedrich Von Schlegel (1772-1829), German philosopher. Aphorism 21 in Selected Aphorisms from the Lyceum (1797), translated by Ernst Behler and Roman Struc, Dialogue on Poetry and Literary Aphorisms, Pennsylvania University Press (1968).)
  • 29.
    One can translate an editorial but not a poem. For one can go across the border naked but not without one's skin; for, unlike clothes, one cannot get a new skin.
    (Karl Kraus (1874-1936), Austrian writer. Trans. by Harry Zohn, originally published in Beim Wort genommen (1955). Half-Truths and One-and-a-Half Truths, University of Chicago Press (1990).)
    More quotations from: Karl Kraus, poem
  • 30.
    Just as a new scientific discovery manifests something that was already latent in the order of nature, and at the same time is logically related to the total structure of the existing science, so the new poem manifests something that was already latent in the order of words.
    (Northrop Frye (b. 1912), Canadian literary critic. "Mythical Phase: Symbol as Archetype," second essay, Anatomy of Criticism (1957).)
    More quotations from: Northrop Frye, poem, nature, time
[Hata Bildir]