Members Who Read Most Number Of Poems

Live Scores

Click here to see the rest of the list

Quotations About / On: POEM

  • 31.
    Why do comparisons of words and tone poems (poetry and music) never take into consideration that the word is a mere signifier, but that the sound, aside from being a signifier, is also an object?
    (Franz Grillparzer (1791-1872), Austrian author. Notebooks and Diaries (1820).)
    More quotations from: Franz Grillparzer, music, poetry
  • 32.
    It is with roses and locomotives (not to mention acrobats Spring electricity Coney Island the 4th of July the eyes of mice and Niagara Falls) that my "poems" are competing.
    (E.E. (Edward Estlin) Cummings (1894-1962), U.S. poet. Is 5, foreword (1926).)
  • 33.
    I try to make a rough music, a dance of the mind, a calculus of the emotions, a driving beat of praise out of the pain and mystery that surround me and become me. My poems are meant to make your mind get up and shout.
    (Judith Johnson Sherwin (b. 1936), U.S. poet. As quoted in Contemporary Poets, 3rd ed., by James Vinson (1980).)
  • 34.
    Poetry, whose material is language, is perhaps the most human and least worldly of the arts, the one in which the end product remains closest to the thought that inspired it.... Of all things of thought, poetry is the closest to thought, and a poem is less a thing than any other work of art ...
    (Hannah Arendt (1906-1975), U.S. philosopher. The Human Condition, ch. 23 (1958).)
    More quotations from: Hannah Arendt, poetry, poem, work
  • 35.
    No other human being, no woman, no poem or music, book or painting can replace alcohol in its power to give man the illusion of real creation.
    (Marguerite Duras (b. 1914), French author. "Alcohol," Practicalities (1987, trans. 1990).)
  • 36.
    Once I planned to write a book of poems entirely about the things in my pocket. But I found it would be too long; and the age of the great epics is past.
    (Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "A Piece of Chalk," Tremendous Trifles (1909).)
    More quotations from: Gilbert Keith Chesterton
  • 37.
    When one's not writing poems—and I'm not at the moment—you wonder how you ever did it. It's like another country you can't reach.
    (May Sarton (1912-1995), U.S. author. As quoted in Women Writers Talking, ch. 1, by Janet Todd (1983).)
    More quotations from: May Sarton
  • 38.
    Poetry is, above all, an approach to the truth of feeling.... A fine poem will seize your imagination intellectually—that is, when you reach it, you will reach it intellectually too— but the way is through emotion, through what we call feeling.
    (Muriel Rukeyser (1913-1980), U.S. poet. The Life of Poetry, ch. 1 (1949).)
  • 39.
    Some poems are for holidays only. They are polished and sweet, but it is the sweetness of sugar, and not such as toil gives to sour bread. The breath with which the poet utters his verse must be that by which he lives.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 365, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, sugar
  • 40.
    The poem has a social effect of some kind whether or not the poet wills it to have. It has kinetic force, it sets in motion ... [ellipsis in source] elements in the reader that would otherwise be stagnant.
    (Denise Levertov (b. 1923), U.S. poet. As quoted in Against Forgetting, sect. 5, by Carolyn Forche (1993). Written in 1965, during the Vietnam War; Levertov was active in the movement opposing American involvement in that war.)
    More quotations from: Denise Levertov, poem
[Hata Bildir]