Quotations About / On: POEM

  • 41.
    One ought, every day at least, to hear a little song, read a good poem, see a fine picture, and, if it were possible, to speak a few reasonable words.
    (Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749-1832), German poet, dramatist. Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship, bk. 5, ch. 1 (1795-1796), trans. by Thomas Carlyle.)
  • 42.
    Ordering a man to write a poem is like commanding a pregnant woman to give birth to a red-headed child.
    (Carl Sandburg (1878-1967), U.S. poet. Quoted in The Reader's Digest (Pleasantville, New York, February, 1978).)
  • 43.
    To a poet the mere making of a poem can seem to solve the problem of truth ... but only a problem of art is solved in poetry.
    (Laura Riding (1901-1991), U.S. poet. Selected Poems: In Five Sets, preface (1975).)
    More quotations from: Laura Riding, poem, poetry, truth
  • 44.
    To read a poem is to hear it with our eyes; to hear it is to see it with our ears.
    (Octavio Paz (b. 1914), Mexican poet. "Recapitulations," Alternating Current (1967).)
    More quotations from: Octavio Paz, poem
  • 45.
    The award of a pure gold medal for poetry would flatter the recipient unduly: no poem ever attains such carat purity.
    (Robert Graves (1895-1985), British poet, novelist. Address, January 1960, to the Oxford University Philological Society. "Poetic Gold," Oxford Addresses on Poetry (1962). Graves had been awarded a gold medal for services to poetry by the National Poetry Society of America.)
    More quotations from: Robert Graves, poem, poetry
  • 46.
    Every day one should at least listen to a little song, read a good poem, look at a fine painting, and, if possible, say a few reasonable words.
    (Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749-1832), German poet, dramatist. Serlo, in Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship, bk. V, ch. 1 (1795-1796).)
  • 47.
    Every day we should hear at least one little song, read one good poem, see one exquisite picture, and, if possible, speak a few sensible words.
    (Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749-1832), German poet, dramatist. Serlo, in Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship, bk. 5, ch. 1 (1795-1796), trans. by Thomas Carlyle.)
  • 48.
    In each of us there is a poem and a song. For most, a poem that will never be written and a song that will never be sung
    (I am very grateful for poemhunter.com for allowing everyday people to express their themselves through poetry.)
    More quotations from: Darwin Henry Beuning
  • 49.
    What would we not give for some great poem to read now, which would be in harmony with the scenery,—for if men read aright, methinks they would never read anything but poems. No history nor philosophy can supply their place.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 93, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, poem, history
  • 50.
    Let us dismiss, as irrelevant to the poem per se, the circumstance ... which, in the first place, gave rise to the intention of composing a poem that should suit at once the popular and the critical taste.
    (Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. "The Philosophy of Composition," Graham's Magazine (1846). Disingenuously dismissing private motives.)
    More quotations from: Edgar Allan Poe, poem
[Hata Bildir]