Quotations About / On: POETRY

  • 21.
    Yet, it is true, poetry is delicious; the best prose is that which is most full of poetry.
    (Virginia Woolf (1882-1941), British novelist. "Montaigne," The Common Reader, First Series (1925).)
    More quotations from: Virginia Woolf, poetry
  • 22.
    From what the moderns want, we must learn what poetry should become; from what the ancients did, what poetry must be.
    (Friedrich Von Schlegel (1772-1829), German philosopher. Aphorism 84 in Selected Aphorisms from the Lyceum (1797), translated by Ernst Behler and Roman Struc, Dialogue on Poetry and Literary Aphorisms, Pennsylvania University Press (1968).)
    More quotations from: Friedrich Von Schlegel, poetry
  • 23.
    Prose on certain occasions can bear a great deal of poetry; on the other hand, poetry sinks and swoons under a moderate weight of prose.
    (Walter Savage Landor (1775-1864), British author. Imaginary Conversations, "Archdeacon Hare and Walter Landor," The Last Fruit of an Old Tree (1853).)
    More quotations from: Walter Savage Landor, poetry
  • 24.
    If there were no poetry on any day in the world, poetry would be invented that day. For there would be an intolerable hunger.
    (Muriel Rukeyser (1913-1980), U.S. poet. The Life of Poetry, ch. 10 (1949).)
    More quotations from: Muriel Rukeyser, poetry, world
  • 25.
    Poetry exists prior to the poet. It descends through the human mind and a poet is born. Poets come and go but poetry remains for ever. Poetry comes when the poet is absent, because poetry is not a making but a happening.
    (Poet & poetry)
    More quotations from: Ramakrushna Sahu
  • 26.
    "Poetry's unnat'ral; no man ever talked poetry 'cept a beadle on boxin' day, or Warren's blackin' or Rowland's oil, or some o' them low fellows; never you let yourself down to talk poetry, my boy."
    (Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. Tony Weller in The Pickwick Papers, ch. 33, p. 452 (1837). The elder Weller, commenting on his son's composition of a valentine.)
    More quotations from: Charles Dickens, poetry
  • 27.
    Poetry is like lemons made lemonade...it turns pain to valuable lessons, disappointments to determinations. If you let it, poetry can truly heal your ills. Its release bandages all sorts of oozing wounds. In the world that is so hurting, we need words that give hope. Music is slowly failing to deliver but poetry will keep to its promise. Poetry is worth a chance! If it was worth in the days of old, to speak poetically in the book of Proverbs and Psalms, why not today? Poetry allows us to go back to true nakedness where we bear our souls unashamed, breaking defensive walls of perfectness to allow others to find their stand through our falls, to reconnect with their humanness, to know that their flaws are not peculiar. ‪#‎ILive‬&BreathePoetry!
    (By Phumla Khanyile)
    More quotations from: PHUMLA KHANYILE
  • 28.
    It's not like bullshit, more like poetry.
    (William Gibson (b. 1948), U.S. science fiction (cyberpunk) writer. Molly Millions (razor-girl, former "meat-puppet," and antiheroine) in Neuromancer. Ch. 8, Ace Science Fiction (1984). Describing the visionary language of the Rastafarians of "Zion cluster," an orbiting colony in a dystopian near-future.)
    More quotations from: William Gibson, poetry
  • 29.
    Some people go to priests; others to poetry; I to my friends.
    (Virginia Woolf (1882-1941), British novelist. (repr. 1943). Bernard, in The Waves, p. 189 (1931).)
    More quotations from: Virginia Woolf, poetry, people
  • 30.
    Poetry transforms and redeems the common, the hurtful, the humiliating.
    (Susan Montez (b. c. 1956), U.S. poet. As quoted in the Chronicle of Higher Education, p. A43 (July 13, 1994).)
    More quotations from: Susan Montez, poetry
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