Treasure Island

Quotations About / On: POETRY

  • 31.
    One merit of poetry few persons will deny: it says more and in fewer words than prose.
    (Voltaire [François Marie Arouet] (1694-1778), French philosopher, author. "Poets," Dictionnaire Philosophique (1764).)
  • 32.
    One has only as much morality as one has philosophy and poetry.
    (Friedrich Von Schlegel (1772-1829), German philosopher. Idea 62 in Selected Ideas (1799-1800), translated by Ernst Behler and Roman Struc, Dialogue on Poetry and Literary Aphorisms, Pennsylvania University Press (1968).)
    More quotations from: Friedrich Von Schlegel, poetry
  • 33.
    Fine art, poetry, that kind of thing, elevates a nation ...
    (George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist. Middlemarch, ch. 39 (1871-1872). Said by the novel's character named Mr. Brooke, a likable but comic figure described as "nearly sixty, of acquiescent temper, miscellaneous opinions, and uncertain vote.")
  • 34.
    Versatility of education can be found in our best poetry, but the depth of mankind should be found in the philosopher.
    (Friedrich Von Schlegel (1772-1829), German philosopher. Idea 57 in Selected Ideas (1799-1800), translated by Ernst Behler and Roman Struc, Dialogue on Poetry and Literary Aphorisms, Pennsylvania University Press (1968).)
  • 35.
    Prose and poetry are as different as food and drink.
    (Franz Grillparzer (1791-1872), Austrian author. Dedication in an Album, Poems (1853).)
    More quotations from: Franz Grillparzer, food, poetry
  • 36.
    I am one of those who hold that poetry is never so blithe as in a wanton and irregular subject.
    (Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. "Twenty-Nine Sonnets of Etienne de La Boétie," The Essays (Les Essais), bk. I, ch. 29, Simon Millanges, Bordeaux, first edition (1580).)
    More quotations from: Michel de Montaigne, poetry
  • 37.
    At certain times, men regard poetry merely as a bright flame, but to women it was, and always will be, a warm fire.
    (Franz Grillparzer (1791-1872), Austrian author. "Album Leaf", Poems (1830).)
  • 38.
    What raises great poetry above all else—it is the entire person and also the entire world.
    (Franz Grillparzer (1791-1872), Austrian author. Also: commemorative sheet for Friedrich von Reden and Wilhelm von Wartenegg. Album entry, Poems (1862).)
    More quotations from: Franz Grillparzer, poetry, world
  • 39.
    Poetry has done enough when it charms, but prose must also convince.
    (H.L. (Henry Lewis) Mencken (1880-1956), U.S. journalist, essayist. Prejudices, Third Series, Knopf (1922).)
    More quotations from: H.L. (Henry Lewis) Mencken, poetry
  • 40.
    Poetry, the genre of purest beauty, was born of a truncated woman: her head severed from her body with a sword, a symbolic penis.
    (Andrea Dworkin (b. 1946), U.S. feminist critic. Pornography, ch. 4 (1981).)
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