Quotations About / On: PRIDE

  • 21.
    Authority is pride lead by a figurehead principal, but not by moral accountability; a principal is a principle obstacle to progress, vanity rules stupidity wears head masks.
    (Terence George Craddock April 29 2015.)
  • 22.
    A person who is blinded by pride cannot see anything but his own delusion; he cannot even see the blindfold that is covering his eyes.
    (My comment on a conversation with a Catholic about a close-minded pastor who believes in the 'kenosis theology.')
    More quotations from: Yehoshua Shim'onai
  • 23.
    Pride is recognizing that all that we are, and all that we own and acquire are ours and for us alone, secured by our own efforts and power.
    (just reflecting on the polarity between human pride and humility.)
    More quotations from: Elizabeth Padillo Olesen
  • 24.
    By building relations...we create a source of love and personal pride and belonging that makes living in a chaotic world easier.
    (Susan Lieberman (20th century). New Traditions: Redefining Celebrations for Today's Family, ch. 2 (1991).)
    More quotations from: Susan Lieberman, pride, love, world
  • 25.
    I have such an intense pride of sex that the triumphs of women in art, literature, oratory, science, or song rouse my enthusiasm as nothing else can.
    (Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815-1902), U.S. suffragist, author, and social reformer. Eighty Years and More (1815-1897), ch. 17 (1898).)
  • 26.
    Pride, which inspires us with so much envy, is sometimes of use toward the moderating of it too.
    (François, Duc De La Rochefoucauld (1613-1680), French writer, moralist. repr. F.A. Stokes Co., New York (c. 1930). Moral Maxims and Reflections, no. 282 (1665-1678), trans. London (1706).)
  • 27.
    ... pride is not a bad thing when it only urges us to hide our own hurts—not to hurt others.
    (George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist. Middlemarch, ch. 6 (1871-1872).)
  • 28.
    There is a pride, a self-love, in human minds that will seldom be kept so low as to make men and women humbler than they ought to be.
    (Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1742). Pamela, in Pamela, vol. 4. P. 361.)
  • 29.
    He had not the least pride of birth and rank, that common narrow notion of little minds, that wretched mistaken succedaneum of merit.
    (Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. Characters of Chesterfield, 1778, repr. Augustan Reprint Society, nos. 259-260, p. 43, University of California, Los Angeles (1990). Character of Lord Scarborough, one of Chesterfield's closest friends.)
  • 30.
    By rendering the labor of one, the property of the other, they cherish pride, luxury, and vanity on one side; on the other, vice and servility, or hatred and revolt.
    (James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. National Gazette (December 19, 1791). W.T. Hutchinson et al., The Papers of James Madison, vol. 14, p. 164, Chicago and Charlottesville, Virginia (1962-1991). Comparing slavery to colonies.)
    More quotations from: James Madison, pride
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