Quotations About / On: PRIDE

  • 41.
    I love the pride whose measure is its own eminence and not the insignificance of someone else.
    (Franz Grillparzer (1791-1872), Austrian author. Libussa, in Libussa, act 2 (1872).)
    More quotations from: Franz Grillparzer, pride, love
  • 42.
    When we retreat to the country, we are hiding not from people, but from our pride, which, in the city and among people, operates unfairly and immoderately.
    (Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (1860-1904), Russian author, playwright. Letter, March 17, 1892, to his editor and friend, A.S. Suvorin. Complete Works and Letters in Thirty Volumes, Letters, vol. 5, p. 25, "Nauka" (1976).)
  • 43.
    Nothing has been purchased more dearly than the little bit of reason and sense of freedom which now constitutes our pride.
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher. The Dawn, aph. 18 (1881).)
    More quotations from: Friedrich Nietzsche, pride, freedom
  • 44.
    We have paid for nothing more dearly than for the little bit of human reason and the sense of freedom that currently constitutes our pride.
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. , pp. 31-32, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Dawn, "First Book," aphorism 18 (1881).)
    More quotations from: Friedrich Nietzsche, pride, freedom
  • 45.
    The sin of pride may be a small or a great thing in someone's life, and hurt vanity a passing pinprick, or a self-destroying or ever murderous obsession.
    (Iris Murdoch (b. 1919), British novelist, philosopher. "The Events in Our Town," The Philosopher's Pupil (1983).)
    More quotations from: Iris Murdoch, hurt, pride, life
  • 46.
    Send forth the child and childish man together, and blush for the pride that libels our own old happy state, and gives its title to an ugly and distorted image.
    (Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. The Old Curiosity Shop, ch. 12, p. 93 (1841).)
  • 47.
    Send forth the child and childish man together, and blush for the pride that libels our own old happy state, and gives its title to an ugly and distorted image.
    (Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. The Old Curiosity Shop, ch. 12, p. 93 (1841).)
  • 48.
    All free men, wherever they may live, are citizens of Berlin, and therefore, as a free man, I take pride in the words, Ich bin ein Berliner.
    (John Fitzgerald Kennedy (1917-1963), U.S. Democratic politician, president. Speech, June 26, 1963, West Berlin, Germany. quoted in Kennedy, pt. 5, ch. 21, Theodore C. Sorenson (1965). The words recall Cicero: Civis Romanus sum—"I am a Roman citizen." (In Verrem, speech 5).)
    More quotations from: John Fitzgerald Kennedy, pride
  • 49.
    Our conjectures pass upon us for truths; we will know what we do not know, and often, what we cannot know: so mortifying to our pride is the base suspicion of ignorance.
    (Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. letter, Dec. 14, 1756, Letters Written by the Late Right Honourable Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl, Earl of Chesterfield, to his Son, Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl, Esq, 5th ed., vol. IV, p. 86, London (1774).)
  • 50.
    ... it is seldom a medical man has true religious views—there is too much pride of intellect.
    (George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist. Middlemarch, ch. 31 (1871-1872). The novel's character named Mrs. Bulstrode is warning her beautiful niece, Rosamond Vincy, about the likely impiety of the latter's prospective fiance, Dr. Lydgate.)
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