Quotations About / On: PRIDE

  • 41.
    I can say with pride that I have spent days and nights not reading anything, and that with unflagging energy I use every moment to acquire gradually an encyclopedic lack of education.
    (Karl Kraus (1874-1936), Austrian writer. Trans. by Harry Zohn, originally published in Beim Wort genommen (1955). Half-Truths and One-and-a-Half Truths, University of Chicago Press (1990).)
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  • 42.
    That which occasions so many mistakes in the computations of men, when they expect return for favors, is that the giver's pride and the receiver's cannot agree upon the value of the kindness done.
    (François, Duc De La Rochefoucauld (1613-1680), French writer, moralist. repr. F.A. Stokes Co., New York (c. 1930). Moral Maxims and Reflections, no. 226 (1665-1678), trans. London (1706).)
  • 43.
    To take pride in a library kills it. Then, its motive power shifts over to the critical if admiring visitor, and apologies are necessary and acceptable and the fat is in the fire.
    (Carolyn Wells (1862-1942), U.S. author. The Rest of My Life, ch. 16 (1937).)
    More quotations from: Carolyn Wells, pride, fire, power
  • 44.
    The machine is impersonal, it takes the pride away from a piece of work, the individual merits and defects that go along with all work that is not done by a machine—which is to say, its little bit of humanity.
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 2, pp. 682-683, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). The Wanderer and His Shadow, aphorism 288 (1880).)
    More quotations from: Friedrich Nietzsche, work, pride
  • 45.
    You may have enemies whom you hate, but not enemies whom you despise. You must take pride in your enemy: then your enemy's successes will be your successes as well.
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 4, p. 59, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Zarathustra, in Thus Spoke Zarathustra, First Part, "On War and Warriors," (1883).)
    More quotations from: Friedrich Nietzsche, pride, hate
  • 46.
    It appears to be a matter of national pride that the President is to have more mud, and blacker mud, and filthier mud in front of his door than any other man can afford.
    (Jane Grey Swisshelm (1815-1884), U.S. journalist, author, crusader. article, St. Cloud Democrat (September 24, 1863). Report on conditions in Washington.)
    More quotations from: Jane Grey Swisshelm, pride
  • 47.
    Love in the abstract is not enough for a great man in poverty; he has need of its utmost devotion.... She who is really a wife, one in heart, flesh, and bone, must follow wherever he leads, in whom her life, her strength, her pride, and happiness are centered.
    (Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Later appeared as part of Romans et contes philosophiques (1831), and part of the Etudes philosophiques (1831). It then entered the Comédie humaine (1845, trans. by George Saintsbury, 1971). Raphaël, in The Wild Ass's Skin (La Peau de chagrin), which was first published by Gosselin (1831).)
  • 48.
    Misquotation is, in fact, the pride and privilege of the learned. A widely-read man never quotes accurately, for the rather obvious reason that he has read too widely.
    (Hesketh Pearson (1887-1964), British biographer. Common Misquotations, introduction (1934). "Misquotations," Pearson wrote, "are the only quotations that are never misquoted.")
    More quotations from: Hesketh Pearson, pride
  • 49.
    There are two things that seem to be at the bottom of our constitutions; one is a continual tendency towards politics; the other is family pride; and it is strange how these two feelings run through all of us.
    (Henry Brooks Adams (1838-1918), U.S. historian. Letter, November 3, 1858, to Charles Francis Adams Jr.. Letters, Vol. 1, p. 5, ed. Worthington Chauncy Ford, Houghton Mifflin (1930).)
    More quotations from: Henry Brooks Adams, pride, family
  • 50.
    One who is publicly honest about himself ends up by priding himself somewhat on this honesty: for he knows only too well why he is honest—for the same reasons another person prefers illusion and dissimulation.
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 2, p. 403, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Mixed Opinions and Maxims, aphorism 56, "Honest About Honesty," (1879).)
    More quotations from: Friedrich Nietzsche, honesty
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