Quotations About / On: ROMANTIC

  • 11.
    The boy is a Greek; the youth, romantic; the adult, reflective.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Oration, August 31, 1837, delivered before the Phi Beta Kappa Society, Cambridge, Massachusetts. "The American Scholar," repr. In Emerson: Essays and Lectures, ed. Joel Porte (1983).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, romantic
  • 12.
    Satan, really, is the romantic youth of Jesus re-appearing for a moment.
    (James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Stephen Hero, episode 26, New Directions (1944). Stephen Daedalus is the speaker in this passage from Joyce's unfinished manuscript, Stephen Hero. Less than half the manuscript exists, and it was published only after Joyce's death.)
    More quotations from: James Joyce, romantic
  • 13.
    It may be romantic to search for the salves of society's ills in slow-moving rustic surroundings, or among innocent, unspoiled provincials, if such exist, but it is a waste of time.
    (Jane Jacobs (b. 1916), U.S. urban analyst. The Death and Life of Great American Cities, ch. 22 (1961). Jacobs lived in the lively, diverse Greenwich Village section of Manhattan (New York City).)
    More quotations from: Jane Jacobs, romantic, time
  • 14.
    But these Russians are too romantic—too exaltés; they give way to a morbid love of martyrdom; they think they can do no good to mankind unless they are uncomfortable.
    (H. Seton Merriman (1862-1903), British novelist. Steinmetz, in The Sowers, ch. 1 (1896).)
    More quotations from: H. Seton Merriman, romantic, love
  • 15.
    The compensation of a very early success is a conviction that life is a romantic matter. In the best sense one stays young.
    (F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), U.S. author. "Early Success," essay first published in American Cavalcade (Oct. 1937), The Crack-Up, ed. Edmund Wilson (1945).)
  • 16.
    The essence of romantic love is that wonderful beginning, after which sadness and impossibility may become the rule.
    (Anita Brookner (b. 1938), British novelist, art historian. Rachel, in A Friend From England, ch. 10 (1987). Referring to Michael Sandberg.)
    More quotations from: Anita Brookner, romantic, love
  • 17.
    Personally, I can't see why it would be any less romantic to find a husband in a nice four-color catalogue than in the average downtown bar at happy hour.
    (Barbara Ehrenreich (b. 1941), U.S. author, columnist. First published in Mother Jones (1986). "Tales of the Man Shortage," The Worst Years of Our Lives (1991).)
  • 18.
    ... the whole tenour of female education ... tends to render the best disposed romantic and inconstant; and the remainder vain and mean.
    (Mary Wollstonecraft (1759-1797), British feminist. A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, ch. 4 (1792).)
  • 19.
    What Romantic terminology called genius or talent or inspiration is nothing other than finding the right road empirically, following one's nose, taking shortcuts.
    (Italo Calvino (1923-1985), Italian author, critic. lecture, Nov. 1969, Turin. "Cybernetics and Ghosts," The Literature Machine (1987).)
    More quotations from: Italo Calvino, inspiration, romantic
  • 20.
    By all but the pathologically romantic, it is now recognized that this is not the age of the small man.
    (John Kenneth Galbraith (b. 1908), U.S. economist. The New Industrial State, ch. 3 (1967).)
    More quotations from: John Kenneth Galbraith, romantic
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