Quotations About / On: ROMANTIC

  • 11.
    Classical and romantic: private language of a family quarrel, a dead dispute over the distribution of emphasis between man and nature.
    (Cyril Connolly (1903-1974), British critic. The Unquiet Grave, pt. 3 (1944, rev. 1951).)
  • 12.
    It takes a kind of shabby arrogance to survive in our time, and a fairly romantic nature to want to.
    (Edgar Z. Friedenberg (b. 1921), U.S. sociologist. Title chapter, The Vanishing Adolescent (1959).)
  • 13.
    My mind no longer has romantic abysses, but has become shallow, with many little gaps and cracks.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Twelfth Selection, New York (1993).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley, romantic
  • 14.
    It is hard to speak of sex without being clinical, brutal, or romantic.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Twelfth Selection, New York (1993).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley, romantic
  • 15.
    It is better to have a prosaic husband and to take a romantic lover.
    (Stendhal [Marie Henri Beyle] (1783-1842), French author. "Various Fragments," sct. 10, De l'Amour (1822).)
  • 16.
    Satan, really, is the romantic youth of Jesus re-appearing for a moment.
    (James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Stephen Hero, episode 26, New Directions (1944). Stephen Daedalus is the speaker in this passage from Joyce's unfinished manuscript, Stephen Hero. Less than half the manuscript exists, and it was published only after Joyce's death.)
    More quotations from: James Joyce, romantic
  • 17.
    He must have a truly romantic nature, for he weeps when there is nothing at all to weep about.
    (Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. The Catherine Wheel, in "The Remarkable Rocket," The Happy Prince and Other Tales (1888).)
    More quotations from: Oscar Wilde, romantic, nature
  • 18.
    You can be as romantic as you please about love, Hector; but you mustn't be romantic about money.
    (George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950), Anglo-Irish playwright, critic. (1903). Violet, in Man and Superman, act 2, The Bodley Head Bernard Shaw: Collected Plays with their Prefaces, vol. 2, ed. Dan H. Laurence (1971).)
  • 19.
    Classical art, in a word, stands for form; romantic art for content. The romantic artist expects people to ask, What has he got to say? The classical artist expects them to ask, How does he say it?
    (R.G. (Robin George) Collingwood (1889-1943), British philosopher. "Form and Content in Art," Essays in the Philosophy of Art, Indiana University Press (1964).)
  • 20.
    God's purpose and goals for our lives are a lot more important than any romantic ones. You don't need to see another person to be happy.
    (Life lesson)
    More quotations from: Dexsta Ray
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