Quotations About / On: ROSE

  • 51.
    From the rising of the lark to the lodging of the lamb.
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Dauphin, in Henry V, act 3, sc. 7, l. 31-32. I.e., from dawn to dusk, when the lamb lies down to sleep.)
    More quotations from: William Shakespeare
  • 52.
    The older I get the more I trust in the law according to which the rose and the lily bloom.
    (Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749-1832), German poet, dramatist. Letter, November 9, 1829, to Karl Friedrich Zelter.)
  • 53.
    To rise from error to truth is rare and beautiful.
    (Victor Hugo (1802-1885), French poet, novelist, playwright, essayist. Trans. by William G. Allen. La L├ęgende des si├Ęcles, preface (1859).)
    More quotations from: Victor Hugo, beautiful, truth
  • 54.
    Some rise by sin, and some by virtue fall.
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Escalus, in Measure for Measure, act 2, sc. 1, l. 38. Thinking of the generally virtuous Claudio, sentenced to death by Angelo.)
    More quotations from: William Shakespeare
  • 55.
    Military glory—the attractive rainbow that rises in showers of blood.
    (Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. speech, Jan. 12, 1848, to the House of Representatives. Arguing against the war with Mexico.)
    More quotations from: Abraham Lincoln, rainbow
  • 56.
    The blood is moral: the blood is anti-slavery: it runs cold in the veins: the stomach rises with disgust, and curses slavery.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Address Delivered in Concord on the Anniversary of the Emancipation of the Negroes in the British West Indies, August 1, 1844," Miscellanies (1883, repr. 1903).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, cold
  • 57.
    Really to see the sun rise or go down every day, so to relate ourselves to a universal fact, would preserve us sane forever.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Life Without Principle" (1863), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 4, pp. 472-473, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, forever, sun
  • 58.
    Guns and roses! Prefer the roses than the guns; and, let us live in peace.

    By Edward Kofi Louis.
    (Peace.)
    More quotations from: Edward Kofi Louis
  • 59.
    Man will rise, if God by exception lends him a hand; he will rise by abandoning and renouncing his own means, and letting himself be raised and uplifted by purely celestial means.
    (Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. "Apology For Raymond Sebond," The Essays (Les Essais), bk. II, ch. 12, Simon Millanges, Bordeaux, first edition (1580).)
    More quotations from: Michel de Montaigne, god
  • 60.
    In view of the fact that the number of people living too long has risen catastrophically and still continues to rise.... Question: Must we live as long as modern medicine enables us to?... We control our entry into life, it is time we began to control our exit.
    (Max Frisch (1911-1991), Swiss author, critic. Originally published as Tagebuch 1966-1971, Suhrkamp (1972). Sketchbook 1966-1971, p. 71, trans. by Geoffrey Skelton (1971), Methuen (1974). Introduction to Frisch's semi-satirical musings about a "voluntary death association.")
    More quotations from: Max Frisch, time, people, life
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