Quotations About / On: RUNNING

  • 71.
    The very timber and boards and shingles of which our houses are made grew but yesterday in a wilderness where the Indian still hunts and the moose runs wild.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Ktaadn" (1848) in The Maine Woods (1864), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 3, p. 90, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, yesterday
  • 72.
    The element running through entire nature, which we popularly call Fate, is known to us as limitation. Whatever limits us, we call Fate.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Fate," The Conduct of Life (1860).)
  • 73.
    Think you're escaping and run into yourself. Longest way round is the shortest way home.
    (James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Ulysses, ch. 13, "Nausicaa," The Corrected Text, ed. Hans Walter Gabler, Random House (1986). Leopold Bloom on the basic Joycean plot.)
    More quotations from: James Joyce, home
  • 74.
    The evolution of a highly destined society must be moral; it must run in the grooves of the celestial wheels.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Civilization," Society and Solitude (1870).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • 75.
    I ... ran for Legislature [in 1832] ... and was beaten—the only time I have been beaten by the people.
    (Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Jesse W. Fell, Dec. 20, 1859. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 3, p. 511, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).)
    More quotations from: Abraham Lincoln, time, people
  • 76.
    He even ran away with hunself and became a farsoonerite, saying he would far sooner muddle through the hash of lentils in Europe than meddle with Irrland's split little pea.
    (James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Finnegans Wake, Part I, section vi, Penguin (1976). Shem the Penman's exile in Europe.)
    More quotations from: James Joyce
  • 77.
    Democracy is morose, and runs to anarchy, but in the state, and in the schools, it is indispensable to resist the consolidation of all men into a few men.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Nominalist and Realist," Essays, Second Series (1844).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • 78.
    It appears to me that men are hired to run down men of genius under the mask of translators, but Dante gives too much of Caesar: he is not a republican.
    (William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, engraver. "Annotations to Boyd's Dante," (written c. 1800), published in Complete Writings, ed. Geoffrey Keynes (c. 1957).)
    More quotations from: William Blake
  • 79.
    I am not immortal. Faustus and I are the also-ran.
    (Anne Sexton (1928-1974), U.S. poet. "Faustus and I....")
    More quotations from: Anne Sexton
  • 80.
    The history of persecution is a history of endeavors to cheat nature, to make water run up hill, to twist a rope of sand.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Compensation," Essays, First Series (1841).)
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