Quotations About / On: RUNNING

  • 71.
    I ... ran for Legislature [in 1832] ... and was beaten—the only time I have been beaten by the people.
    (Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Jesse W. Fell, Dec. 20, 1859. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 3, p. 511, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).)
    More quotations from: Abraham Lincoln, time, people
  • 72.
    He even ran away with hunself and became a farsoonerite, saying he would far sooner muddle through the hash of lentils in Europe than meddle with Irrland's split little pea.
    (James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Finnegans Wake, Part I, section vi, Penguin (1976). Shem the Penman's exile in Europe.)
    More quotations from: James Joyce
  • 73.
    Democracy is morose, and runs to anarchy, but in the state, and in the schools, it is indispensable to resist the consolidation of all men into a few men.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Nominalist and Realist," Essays, Second Series (1844).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • 74.
    It appears to me that men are hired to run down men of genius under the mask of translators, but Dante gives too much of Caesar: he is not a republican.
    (William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, engraver. "Annotations to Boyd's Dante," (written c. 1800), published in Complete Writings, ed. Geoffrey Keynes (c. 1957).)
    More quotations from: William Blake
  • 75.
    I am not immortal. Faustus and I are the also-ran.
    (Anne Sexton (1928-1974), U.S. poet. "Faustus and I....")
    More quotations from: Anne Sexton
  • 76.
    The history of persecution is a history of endeavors to cheat nature, to make water run up hill, to twist a rope of sand.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Compensation," Essays, First Series (1841).)
  • 77.
    It seems as if the more youthful and impressible streams can hardly resist the numerous invitations and temptations to leave their native beds and run down their neighbors' channels.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "The Allegash and East Branch" (1864) in The Maine Woods (1864), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 3, p. 271, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, leave
  • 78.
    The cost of a thing is the amount of what I will call life which is required to be exchanged for it, immediately or in the long run.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Economy," Walden (1854).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, life
  • 79.
    It is said that some Western steamers can run on a heavy dew, whence we can imagine what a canoe may do.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "The Allegash and East Branch" (1864) in The Maine Woods (1864), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 3, p. 272, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, imagine
  • 80.
    In the long-run every Government is the exact symbol of its People, with their wisdom and unwisdom; we have to say, Like People like Government.
    (Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881), Scottish essayist, historian. Past and Present, bk. 4, ch. 4 (1843).)
    More quotations from: Thomas Carlyle, people
[Hata Bildir]