Treasure Island

Quotations About / On: SAD

  • 21.
    Timidity keeps me safe and sad in a narrow room.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Eighth Selection, New York (1991).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley, sad
  • 22.
    We're buying this, but why do you sing the same sad songs all women sing?
    (Katharine S. White (1892-1977), U.S. editor and book reviewer. As quoted in Onward and Upward, Prologue, by Linda H. Davis (1986). White, Fiction Editor of the New York Times, sent this note to Phyllis McGinley in the 1940s, along with a check, when buying a skillful, but conventional, story she had submitted. According to McGinley's daughter, she later said "repeatedly" that this had "changed the direction of her whole career.")
    More quotations from: Katharine S White, sad, women
  • 23.
    Morality comes with the sad wisdom of age, when the sense of curiosity has withered.
    (Graham Greene (1904-1991), British novelist. A Sort of Life, ch. 7, sct. 1 (1971).)
    More quotations from: Graham Greene, sad
  • 24.
    The psychiatrist's office: the only place I can be sure my story will be treated as sad, but interesting.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Third Selection, New York (1986).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley, sad
  • 25.
    I have a piece of great and sad news to tell you: I am dead.
    (Jean Cocteau (1889-1963), French author, filmmaker. repr. In Collected Works, vol. 4 (1947). "Visite," Discours du Grand Sommeil (1920).)
    More quotations from: Jean Cocteau, sad
  • 26.
    I had rather have a fool to make me merry than experience to make me sad—and to travel for it too!
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Rosalind, in As You Like It, act 4, sc. 1, l. 27-9. To Jaques, who has been defining his particular melancholy.)
    More quotations from: William Shakespeare, travel, sad
  • 27.
    I see her close beside me with silent lips sad and tremulous.
    (Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. Once I Pass'd through a Populous City (l. 7). . . The Complete Poems [Walt Whitman]. Francis Murphy, ed. (1975; repr. 1986) Penguin Books.)
    More quotations from: Walt Whitman, sad
  • 28.
    Sad. Nothing more than sad. Let's not call it a tragedy; a broken heart is never a tragedy. Only untimely death is a tragedy.
    (Angela Carter (1940-1992), British postmodern novelist. repr. Penguin. Wise Children, ch. 3, Chatto & Windus (1991).)
  • 29.
    It is a time when one's spirit is subdued and sad, one knows not why; when the past seems a storm-swept desolation, life a vanity and a burden, and the future but a way to death.
    (Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author, and Charles Dudley Warner (1892-1900), U.S. author. Of Laura Hawkins's mood. The Gilded Age, ch. 60 (1873).)
  • 30.
    Considered in its entirety, psychoanalysis won't do. It's an end product, moreover, like a dinosaur or a zeppelin; no better theory can ever be erected on its ruins, which will remain for ever one of the saddest and strangest of all landmarks in the history of twentieth-century thought.
    (Peter B. Medawar (1915-1987), British immunologist. "Further Comments on Psychoanalysis," The Hope of Progress (1972).)
    More quotations from: Peter B Medawar, history
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