Quotations About / On: SAD

  • 31.
    There being in the make of an English mind a certain gloom and eagerness, which carries to the sad extreme; religion to fanaticism; free-thinking to atheism; liberty to rebellion.
    (George Berkeley (1685-1753), Irish bishop, philosopher. Crito, in "Alciphron: or the Minute Philosopher," dial. 3, sect. 12, p. 131, The Works of George Berkeley, Bishop of Cloyne, eds. A. Luce and T. Jessop, London, Thomas Nelson and Sons Ltd. (1948-1957).)
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  • 32.
    Grandfather, you were the pillar of fire in front of the camp and now we are left in the camp alone, in the dark; and we are so cold and so sad.
    (Noa Ben-Artzi Philosof (b. 1978), Israeli student, granddaughter of Yitzak Rabin. (November 7, 1995). Spoken at Rabin's funeral, November 6, 1995, New York Times, p. A11. Rabin, Israel's prime minister, had been assassinated two days earlier.)
  • 33.
    Reinhold Niebuhr observes that the sad duty of politics is to establish justice in a sinful world.
    (Jimmy Carter (James Earl Carter, Jr.) (b. 1924), U.S. president. Why Not the Best? P. 93, Nashville, TN: Broadman Press (1975). He is describing the compatibility of religion and politics.)
  • 34.
    The display of grief makes more demands than grief itself. How few men are sad in their own company.
    (Seneca (c. 5-65), Roman writer, philosopher, statesman. Epistulae ad Lucilium, epistle 99.)
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  • 35.
    The South is very beautiful but its beauty makes one sad because the lives that people live here, and have lived here, are so ugly.
    (James Baldwin (1924-1987), U.S. author. repr. In The Price of the Ticket (1985). "They Can't Turn Back," Mademoiselle (New York, Aug. 1960).)
  • 36.
    The psychiatrist's office: the only place I can be sure my story will be treated as sad, but interesting.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Third Selection, New York (1986).)
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  • 37.
    It is a sad fact about our culture that a poet can earn much more money writing or talking about his art than he can by practicing it.
    (W.H. (Wystan Hugh) Auden (1907-1973), Anglo-American poet. The Dyer's Hand, foreword (1962). Opening words.)
  • 38.
    That we have but little faith is not sad, but that we have little faithfulness. By faithfulness faith is earned.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Letter, May 2, 1848, to Harrison Blake, in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 6, p. 167, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, faith, sad
  • 39.
    There's no true drop of blood in him to be truly touched with love; if he be sad, he wants money.
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Don Pedro, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 3, sc. 2, l. 18-20. Unable to believe Benedick can fall in love; "wants" means is in need of, lacks.)
  • 40.
    I had rather have a fool to make me merry than experience to make me sad—and to travel for it too!
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Rosalind, in As You Like It, act 4, sc. 1, l. 27-9. To Jaques, who has been defining his particular melancholy.)
    More quotations from: William Shakespeare, travel, sad
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