Quotations About / On: SAD

  • 41.
    The display of grief makes more demands than grief itself. How few men are sad in their own company.
    (Seneca (c. 5-65), Roman writer, philosopher, statesman. Epistulae ad Lucilium, epistle 99.)
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  • 42.
    The South is very beautiful but its beauty makes one sad because the lives that people live here, and have lived here, are so ugly.
    (James Baldwin (1924-1987), U.S. author. repr. In The Price of the Ticket (1985). "They Can't Turn Back," Mademoiselle (New York, Aug. 1960).)
  • 43.
    The psychiatrist's office: the only place I can be sure my story will be treated as sad, but interesting.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Third Selection, New York (1986).)
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  • 44.
    It is a sad fact about our culture that a poet can earn much more money writing or talking about his art than he can by practicing it.
    (W.H. (Wystan Hugh) Auden (1907-1973), Anglo-American poet. The Dyer's Hand, foreword (1962). Opening words.)
  • 45.
    That we have but little faith is not sad, but that we have little faithfulness. By faithfulness faith is earned.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Letter, May 2, 1848, to Harrison Blake, in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 6, p. 167, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, faith, sad
  • 46.
    There's no true drop of blood in him to be truly touched with love; if he be sad, he wants money.
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Don Pedro, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 3, sc. 2, l. 18-20. Unable to believe Benedick can fall in love; "wants" means is in need of, lacks.)
  • 47.
    I had rather have a fool to make me merry than experience to make me sad—and to travel for it too!
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Rosalind, in As You Like It, act 4, sc. 1, l. 27-9. To Jaques, who has been defining his particular melancholy.)
    More quotations from: William Shakespeare, travel, sad
  • 48.
    I cannot hide what I am. I must be sad when I have cause, and smile at no man's jests.
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Don John, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 1, sc. 3, l. 13-4. Showing his morose nature.)
    More quotations from: William Shakespeare, smile, sad
  • 49.
    The Count is neither sad, nor sick, nor merry, nor well; but civil count, civil as an orange, and something of that jealous complexion.
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Beatrice, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 2, sc. 1, l. 293-5. Referring to the jealous Claudio; "civil" puns on "Seville," where the bittersweet oranges used to make marmalade are grown.)
    More quotations from: William Shakespeare, sick, sad
  • 50.
    Differences between sad remembrance ceremonies honouring the dead, and government romance parades glorifying war, justifying new wars; remembrance of sad tragic youth soldiers lost serves as a warning, do not enter lightly into conflict zones swift foolish run off to fight wars, saber rattling foolish leaders politicians too soon condemn, new generations of healthy steadfast youth into hellstorm baptism of fire; abstain from war, let children bury parents in natural cycle of life, let not old crippled parents bury their babies as young men as slain blown apart dead.
    (Terence George Craddock 25.4.2015)
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