Quotations About / On: SCHOOL

  • 51.
    A school without grades must have been concocted by someone who was drunk on non-alcoholic wine.
    (Karl Kraus (1874-1936), Austrian writer. Trans. by Harry Zohn, originally published in Beim Wort genommen (1955). Half-Truths and One-and-a-Half Truths, University of Chicago Press (1990).)
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  • 52.
    I put forward formless and unresolved notions, as do those who publish doubtful questions to debate in the schools, not to establish the truth but to seek it.
    (Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. "Of Prayers," The Essays (Les Essais), bk. I, ch. 56, Simon Millanges, Bordeaux, first edition (1580).)
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  • 53.
    Thus we steadily worship Mammon, both school and state and church, and on the seventh day curse God with a tintamar from one end of the Union to the other.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Slavery in Massachusetts" (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 4, p. 402, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
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  • 54.
    But why go to California for a text? She is the child of New England, bred at her own school and church.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Life Without Principle" (1863), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 4, p. 468, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, school, child
  • 55.
    The household is a school of power. There, within the door, learn the tragi-comedy of human life.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Education," Lectures and Biographical Sketches (1883, repr. 1904).)
  • 56.
    Democracy is morose, and runs to anarchy, but in the state, and in the schools, it is indispensable to resist the consolidation of all men into a few men.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Nominalist and Realist," Essays, Second Series (1844).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • 57.
    Masses are rude, lame, unmade, pernicious in their demands and influence, and need not to be flattered but to be schooled.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Considerations by the Way," The Conduct of Life (1860).)
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  • 58.
    The scholar may lose himself in schools, in words, and become a pedant; but when he comprehends his duties, he above all men is a realist, and converses with things.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Speech, July 24, 1838, at Dartmouth College. "Literary Ethics," Nature, Addresses, and Lectures (1849).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • 59.
    Absolute catholicity of taste is not without its dangers. It is only an auctioneer who should admire all schools of art.
    (Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Pall Mall Gazette (London, Feb. 8, 1886).)
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  • 60.
    Aristotle and Plato are reckoned the respective heads of two schools. A wise man will see that Aristotle platonizes.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Circles," Essays, First Series (1841, repr. 1847).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson
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