Quotations About / On: SCHOOL

  • 61.
    It's important for all single parents to remember that not everything that goes wrong, from your son's bad attitude toward school to the six holes in your teenage daughter's ear, is because you live in a single-parent home. Every family has its problems.
    (Marge Kennedy (20th century), U.S. writer, and Janet Spencer King (20th century), U.S. writer. The Single Parent Family, ch. 6 (1994).)
  • 62.
    ... to improve both sexes they ought, not only in private families, but in public schools, to be educated together. If marriage be the cement of society, mankind should all be educated after the same model, or the intercourse of the sexes will never deserve the name of fellowship ...
    (Mary Wollstonecraft (1759-1797), British feminist. A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, ch. 12 (1792). Referring to the custom of educating the sexes in separate schools and having them follow different courses of study.)
  • 63.
    The real American type can never be a ballet dancer. The legs are too long, the body too supple and the spirit too free for this school of affected grace and toe walking.
    (Isadora Duncan (1878-1927), U.S. dancer. My Life, ch. 30 (1927).)
    More quotations from: Isadora Duncan, school
  • 64.
    When I was in high school I thought a vocation was a particular calling. Here's a voice: "Come, follow me." My idea of a calling now is not: "Come." It's like what I'm doing right now, not what I'm going to be. Life is a calling.
    (Rebecca Sweeney (b. 1938), U.S. ex-nun. As quoted in Working, book 9, by Studs Terkel (1973). Thirty-five years old and unmarried, Sweeney had held a variety of jobs, including six years as a nun.)
    More quotations from: Rebecca Sweeney, school, life
  • 65.
    Obviously, it's a great privilege and pleasure to be here at the Yale Law School Sesquicentennial Convocation. And I defy anyone to say that and chew gum at the same time.
    (Gerald R. Ford (b. 1913), U.S. president. Yale Law School Anniversary Speech (April 25, 1975). A Time to Heal, p. 270, Harper & Row (1979). Referring to Lyndon Johnson's description of Ford as unable to walk and chew gum at the same time.)
    More quotations from: Gerald R Ford, school, time
  • 66.
    One fellow I was dating in medical school ... was a veterinarian and he wanted to get married. I said, but you're going to be moving to Minneapolis, and he said, oh, you can quit and I'll take care of you. I said, "Go."
    (Sylvia Beckman (b. c. 1931), U.S. ophthalmologist. As quoted in The Fifties, ch. 8, by Brett Harvey (1993). Beckman, an interviewee in Harvey's oral history of the 1950s, was recalling her years as a student at the Women's Medical College of Pennsylvania in the late fifties.)
    More quotations from: Sylvia Beckman, school
  • 67.
    In a large university, there are as many deans and executive heads as there are schools and departments. Their relations to one another are intricate and periodic; in fact, "galaxy" is too loose a term: it is a planetarium of deans with the President of the University as a central sun. One can see eclipses, inner systems, and oppositions.
    (Jacques Barzun (b. 1907), French-born U.S. critic, educator. Teacher in America, ch. 13, Little, Brown (1954).)
    More quotations from: Jacques Barzun, sun
  • 68.
    When we leave our child in nursery school for the first time, it won't be just our child's feelings about separation that we will have to cope with, but our own feelings as well—from our present and from our past, parents are extra vulnerable to new tremors from old earthquakes.
    (Fred Rogers (20th century), U.S. children's TV personality and author. Mister Rogers Talks With Parents, ch. 1 (1983).)
  • 69.
    ...the shiny-cheeked merchant bankers from London with eighties striped blue ties and white collars and double-barreled names and double chins and double-breasted suits, who said "ears" when they meant "yes" and "hice" when they meant "house" and "school" when they meant "Eton"...
    (John le Carré (b. 1931), British novelist. Roper's description of the people he calls "the Necessary Evils" in The Night Manager, ch. 17, Alfred A. Knopf (1993).)
  • 70.
    The real American type can never be a ballet dancer. The legs are too long, the body too supple and the spirit too free for this school of affected grace and toe walking.
    (Isadora Duncan (1878-1927), U.S. dancer. My Life, ch. 30 (1927).)
    More quotations from: Isadora Duncan, school
[Hata Bildir]