Quotations About / On: SCHOOL

  • 71.
    One fellow I was dating in medical school ... was a veterinarian and he wanted to get married. I said, but you're going to be moving to Minneapolis, and he said, oh, you can quit and I'll take care of you. I said, "Go."
    (Sylvia Beckman (b. c. 1931), U.S. ophthalmologist. As quoted in The Fifties, ch. 8, by Brett Harvey (1993). Beckman, an interviewee in Harvey's oral history of the 1950s, was recalling her years as a student at the Women's Medical College of Pennsylvania in the late fifties.)
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  • 72.
    Obviously, it's a great privilege and pleasure to be here at the Yale Law School Sesquicentennial Convocation. And I defy anyone to say that and chew gum at the same time.
    (Gerald R. Ford (b. 1913), U.S. president. Yale Law School Anniversary Speech (April 25, 1975). A Time to Heal, p. 270, Harper & Row (1979). Referring to Lyndon Johnson's description of Ford as unable to walk and chew gum at the same time.)
    More quotations from: Gerald R Ford, school, time
  • 73.
    When I was in high school I thought a vocation was a particular calling. Here's a voice: "Come, follow me." My idea of a calling now is not: "Come." It's like what I'm doing right now, not what I'm going to be. Life is a calling.
    (Rebecca Sweeney (b. 1938), U.S. ex-nun. As quoted in Working, book 9, by Studs Terkel (1973). Thirty-five years old and unmarried, Sweeney had held a variety of jobs, including six years as a nun.)
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  • 74.
    The real American type can never be a ballet dancer. The legs are too long, the body too supple and the spirit too free for this school of affected grace and toe walking.
    (Isadora Duncan (1878-1927), U.S. dancer. My Life, ch. 30 (1927).)
    More quotations from: Isadora Duncan, school
  • 75.
    ... to improve both sexes they ought, not only in private families, but in public schools, to be educated together. If marriage be the cement of society, mankind should all be educated after the same model, or the intercourse of the sexes will never deserve the name of fellowship ...
    (Mary Wollstonecraft (1759-1797), British feminist. A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, ch. 12 (1792). Referring to the custom of educating the sexes in separate schools and having them follow different courses of study.)
  • 76.
    It's important for all single parents to remember that not everything that goes wrong, from your son's bad attitude toward school to the six holes in your teenage daughter's ear, is because you live in a single-parent home. Every family has its problems.
    (Marge Kennedy (20th century), U.S. writer, and Janet Spencer King (20th century), U.S. writer. The Single Parent Family, ch. 6 (1994).)
  • 77.
    I feel like my sixteenth birthday and the time I graduated from high school, and the first time I flew solo all wrapped up in one.
    (Dalton Trumbo (1905-1976), U.S. screenwriter, and Victor Fleming. Dorinda Durston (Irene Dunne), A Guy Named Joe, when she's wearing the new dress Pete gave her (1943). Adaptation by Frederick Hazlitt Brennan from an original story by Chandler Sprague and David Boehm; original name, James Dalton Trumbo.)
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  • 78.
    For millions of men and women, the church has been the hospital for the soul, the school for the mind and the safe depository for moral ideas.
    (Gerald R. Ford (b. 1913), U.S. president. Speech at the International Eucharistic Conference, Philadelphia, reported in the Los Angeles Herald-Examiner (August 13, 1976).)
    More quotations from: Gerald R Ford, school, women
  • 79.
    At school boys become gluttons and slovens, and, instead of cultivating domestic affections, very early rush into the libertinism which destroys the constitution before it is formed; hardening the heart as it weakens the understanding.
    (Mary Wollstonecraft (1759-1797), British feminist. A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, ch. 12 (1792). Of British boarding schools.)
    More quotations from: Mary Wollstonecraft, school, heart
  • 80.
    ... the time will come when no servant will be hired without a diploma from some training school, and a girl will as much expect to fit herself for house-maid or cook, as for dressmaker or any trade.
    (Lydia Hoyt Farmer (1842-1903), U.S. author. What America Owes to Women, ch. 10 (1893). Farmer's editorial showed the influence of the domestic science movement, which attempted to scientize and professionalize housework.)
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