Quotations About / On: SCHOOL

  • 71.
    I would urge that the yeast of education is the idea of excellence, and the idea of excellence comprises as many forms as there are individuals, each of whom develops his own image of excellence. The school must have as one of its principal functions the nurturing of images of excellence.
    (Jerome S. Bruner (20th century), U.S. psychologist and educator. "After John Dewey, What?" Bank Street College of Education Publication (March 1961).)
    More quotations from: Jerome S Bruner, school, education
  • 72.
    I had my good looks, my blond hair, my height, build, and bullfighting school, I suppose I became one of the Village equivalents of an Eagle Scout badge for the girls. I was one of the credits needed for a diploma in the sexual humanities.
    (Norman Mailer (b. 1923), U.S. author. Sergius O'Shaugnessy, in "The Time of Her Time," Advertisements for Myself, p. 485, Putnam's (1959).)
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  • 73.
    The shrewd guess, the fertile hypothesis, the courageous leap to a tentative conclusion—these are the most valuable coin of the thinker at work. But in most schools guessing is heavily penalized and is associated somehow with laziness.
    (Jerome S. Bruner (b. 1915), U.S. psychologist. The Process of Education (1960).)
    More quotations from: Jerome S Bruner, work
  • 74.
    You had to have seen the corpses lying there in front of the school—the men with their caps covering their faces—to know the meaning of class hatred and the spirit of revenge.
    (Alfred Döblin (1878-1957), German-Jewish novelist, physician. Trans. by David Dollenmayer. "First Glance Back," 1928, Autobiographical Writings, ed. Erich Kleinschmidt (1986). On the government's bloody suppression of a workers' uprising in Berlin, March 1919.)
    More quotations from: Alfred Döblin, school
  • 75.
    Mighty few young black women are doin' domestic work. And I'm glad. That's why I want my kids to go to school. This one lady told me, "All you people are gettin' like that." I said, "I'm glad." There's no more gettin' on their knees.
    (Maggie Holmes, African American domestic worker. As quoted in Working, book 3, by Studs Terkel (1973). Raised poor, uneducated, Holmes had been a domestic all her life.)
  • 76.
    The term preschooler signals another change in our expectations of children. While toddler refers to physical development, preschooler refers to a social and intellectual activity: going to school. That shift in emphasis is tremendously important, for it is at this age that we think of children as social creatures who can begin to solve problems.
    (Lawrence Kutner (20th century), U.S. child psychologist and author. Toddlers and Preschoolers, introduction (1994).)
  • 77.
    [How] the young . . . can grow from the primitive to the civilized, from emotional anarchy to the disciplined freedom of maturity without losing the joy of spontaneity and the peace of self-honesty is a problem of education that no school and no culture have ever solved.
    (Leontine Young (20th century), U.S. social worker and author. Life Among the Giants, ch. 1 (1965).)
  • 78.
    The real American type can never be a ballet dancer. The legs are too long, the body too supple and the spirit too free for this school of affected grace and toe walking.
    (Isadora Duncan (1878-1927), U.S. dancer. My Life, ch. 30 (1927).)
    More quotations from: Isadora Duncan, school
  • 79.
    ...the shiny-cheeked merchant bankers from London with eighties striped blue ties and white collars and double-barreled names and double chins and double-breasted suits, who said "ears" when they meant "yes" and "hice" when they meant "house" and "school" when they meant "Eton"...
    (John le Carré (b. 1931), British novelist. Roper's description of the people he calls "the Necessary Evils" in The Night Manager, ch. 17, Alfred A. Knopf (1993).)
  • 80.
    When we leave our child in nursery school for the first time, it won't be just our child's feelings about separation that we will have to cope with, but our own feelings as well—from our present and from our past, parents are extra vulnerable to new tremors from old earthquakes.
    (Fred Rogers (20th century), U.S. children's TV personality and author. Mister Rogers Talks With Parents, ch. 1 (1983).)
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