Quotations About / On: SEA

  • 41.
    In tremendous extremities human souls are like drowning men; well enough they know they are in peril; well enough they know the causes of that peril;Mnevertheless, the sea is the sea, and these drowning men do drown.
    (Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Pierre (1852), bk. XXII, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 7, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1971).)
    More quotations from: Herman Melville, sea
  • 42.
    Be mine the tomb that swallowed up Pharaoh and all his hosts; let me lie down with Drake, where he sleeps in the sea.
    (Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. White-Jacket (1850), ch. 19, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 5, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1969).)
    More quotations from: Herman Melville, sea
  • 43.
    The sea speaks a language polite people never repeat. It is a colossal scavenger slang and has no respect.
    (Carl Sandburg (1878-1967), U.S. poet. Two Nocturnes.)
    More quotations from: Carl Sandburg, respect, sea, people
  • 44.
    To be rich is to have a ticket of admission to the masterworks and chief men of each race. It is to have the sea, by voyaging; to visit the mountains, Niagara, the Nile, the desert, Rome, Paris, Constantinople: to see galleries, libraries, arsenals, manufactories.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Wealth," The Conduct of Life (1860).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, paris, sea
  • 45.
    The most advanced nations are always those who navigate the most. The power which the sea requires in the sailor makes a man of him very fast, and the change of shores and population clears his head of much nonsense of his wigwam.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Civilization," Society and Solitude (1870).)
  • 46.
    The mountains, the forest, and the sea, render men savage; they develop the fierce, but yet do not destroy the human.
    (Victor Hugo (1802-1885), French poet, dramatist, novelist. "Fantine," bk. 2, ch. 6, Les Misérables (1862).)
    More quotations from: Victor Hugo, forest, sea
  • 47.
    It is the time we have now, and all our wasted time sinks into the sea and is swallowed up without a trace. The past is dust and ashes, and this incommensurably wide way leads to the pragmatic and kinetic future.
    (John Ashbery (b. 1927), U.S. poet, critic. "The System.")
    More quotations from: John Ashbery, time, future, sea
  • 48.
    The question of armaments, whether on land or sea, is the most immediately and intensely practical question connected with the future fortunes of nations and of mankind.
    (Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. Address to the Senate (January 22, 1917).)
    More quotations from: Woodrow Wilson, future, sea
  • 49.
    The fact that Romans once inhabited her reflects no little dignity on Nature herself; that from some particular hill the Roman once looked out on the sea.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 264, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, sea, nature
  • 50.
    To study the stars upon the wide, boundless sea, is divine as it was to the Chaldean Magi, who observed their revolutions from the plains.
    (Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. White-Jacket (1850), ch. 19, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 5, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1969).)
    More quotations from: Herman Melville, sea
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