Quotations About / On: SHINE

  • 11.
    The stars which shone over Babylon and the stable in Bethlehem still shine as brightly over the Empire State Building and your front yard today. They perform their cycles with the same mathematical precision, and they will continue to affect each thing on earth, including man, as long as the earth exists.
    (Linda Goodman (b. 1929), U.S. astrologer. Linda Goodman's Sun Signs, afterword (1968).)
    More quotations from: Linda Goodman, shine, today
  • 12.
    People press toward the light not in order to see better but in order to shine better.—We are happy to regard the one before whom we shine as light.
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 2, p. 663, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). The Wanderer and His Shadow, aphorism 254, "Toward the Light," (1880).)
  • 13.
    It will be no excuse to an idle and untoward servant, who would not attend his business by candle-light, to plead that he had not broad sun-shine. The candle, that is set up in us, shines bright enough for all our purposes.
    (John Locke (1632-1704), British philosopher. An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, bk. 1, ch. 1, sect. 5, p. 45, ed. P. Nidditch, Oxford, Clarendon Press (1975).)
    More quotations from: John Locke, shine, sun, light
  • 14.
    Now, you mummy's darlings, get a rift on them boots. Definitely shine 'em, my little curly-headed lambs, for in our mob, war or no war, you die with clean boots on.
    (Gerald Kersh (1911-1968), British author, journalist. They Die With Their Boots Clean, prologue (1941).)
    More quotations from: Gerald Kersh, shine, war
  • 15.
    Second-rate knowledge, and middling talents, carry a man farther at courts, and in the busy part of the world, than superior knowledge and shining parts.
    (Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. Letter, June 20, 1751, Letters Written by the Late Right Honourable Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl, Earl of Chesterfield, to his Son, Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl, Esq, 5th ed., vol. III, p. 213, London (1774).)
  • 16.
    To a surprising extent the war-lords in shining armour, the apostles of the martial virtues, tend not to die fighting when the time comes. History is full of ignominious getaways by the great and famous.
    (George Orwell (1903-1950), British author. repr. in The Collected Essays, Journalism and Letters of George Orwell, vol. 2, eds. Sonia Orwell and Ian Angus (1968). "Who Are the War Criminals?" (1943).)
    More quotations from: George Orwell, war, history, time
  • 17.
    Critics are reprimanded when they get sarcastic. How absurd! Is the torch of criticism supposed to shine without burning?
    (Franz Grillparzer (1791-1872), Austrian author. Notebooks and Diaries (1809).)
    More quotations from: Franz Grillparzer, shine
  • 18.
    Physical love, so unjustly decried, forces everyone to manifest even the smallest bits of kindness he possesses, of selflessness, that they shine in the eyes of all who surround him.
    (Marcel Proust (1871-1922), French novelist. Nouvelle Revue Française (1913). Remembrance of Things Past, vol. I, Swann's Way, p. 147, Pléiade (1954).)
    More quotations from: Marcel Proust, shine, love
  • 19.
    If you have wit, use it to please, and not to hurt; you may shine, like the sun in the temperature zones, without scorching. Here it is wished for; under the Line it is dreaded.
    (Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. letter, Sept. 5, 1748, Letters Written by the Late Right Honourable Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl, Earl of Chesterfield, to his Son, Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl, Esq, 5th ed., vol. II, p. 58, London (1774). "Under the Line" means below the equator.)
  • 20.
    Your eyes, your eyes, they shine like the pants of a blue serge suit. That's not a reflection on you—it's on the pants.
    (Morrie Ryskind, U.S. screenwriter, Robert Florey, and Joseph Santley. Mr. Hammer (Groucho Marx), The Cocoanuts, trying to make love to the wealthy Mrs. Potter (Margaret Dumont) (1929). Ryskind adapted this film from original Broadway play by George Kaufman.)
    More quotations from: Morrie Ryskind, shine, blue
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