Treasure Island

Quotations About / On: SHINE

  • 41.
    The radiance was that of the full, setting, and blood-red moon, which now shone vividly through that once barely- discernible fissure,... extending from the roof of the building, in a zigzag direction, to the base. While I gazed, this fissure rapidly widened.
    (Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. The narrator, in "The Fall of the House of Usher," Burton's Gentleman's Magazine (1839). A metaphor for the defloration of the deceased Madeline Usher.)
    More quotations from: Edgar Allan Poe, red, moon
  • 42.
    It becomes the moralist, too, to inquire what man might do to improve and beautify the system; what to make the stars shine more brightly, the sun more cheery and joyous, the moon more placid and content.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Paradise (To Be) Regained" (1843), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 4, p. 283, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
  • 43.
    If you have done terrible things, you must endure terrible things; for thus the sacred light of injustice shines bright.
    (Sophocles (497-406/5 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Ajax, l. 11.)
    More quotations from: Sophocles, light
  • 44.
    The gods are partial to no era, but steadily shines their light in the heavens, while the eye of the beholder is turned to stone. There was but the sun and the eye from the first. The ages have not added a new ray to the one, nor altered a fibre of the other.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 164, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, sun, light
  • 45.
    The light by which we see in this world comes out from the soul of the observer. Wherever any noble sentiment dwelt, it made the faces and houses around to shine. Nay, the powers of this busy brain are miraculous and illimitable.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Success," Society and Solitude (1870).)
  • 46.
    Teaching is the perpetual end and office of all things. Teaching, instruction is the main design that shines through the sky and earth.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Quoted in Robert D. Richardson, Jr., Emerson: The Mind on Fire, ch. 25 (1995).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, sky
  • 47.
    The intellect,—that is miraculous! Who has it, has the talisman: his skin and bones, though they were of the color of night, are transparent, and the everlasting stars shine through, with attractive beams.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Address Delivered in Concord on the Anniversary of the Emancipation of the Negroes in the British West Indies, August 1, 1844," Miscellanies (1883, repr. 1903).)
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