Quotations About / On: SHINE

  • 41.
    Statesmen and beauties are very rarely sensible of the gradations of their decay; and, too sanguinely hoping to shine on in their meridian, often set with contempt and ridicule.
    (Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. letter, Feb. 26, 1754, Letters Written by the Late Right Honourable Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl, Earl of Chesterfield, to his Son, Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl, Esq, 5th ed., vol. IV, p. 61, London (1774).)
  • 42.
    No one will ever shine in conversation, who thinks of saying fine things: to please, one must say many things indifferent, and many very bad.
    (Francis Lockier (1668-1740), British prelate, man of letters. quoted in Joseph Spence, Anecdotes, pt. 2, "1730-32," (1820).)
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  • 43.
    Justice shines in very smoky homes, and honors the righteous; but the gold-spangled mansions where the hands are unclean she leaves with eyes averted.
    (Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Agamemnon, l. 773.)
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  • 44.
    The most ordinary word, when put into place, suddenly acquires brilliance. That is the brilliance with which your images must shine.
    (Robert Bresson (b. 1907), French film director. "1950-1958: Exercises," Notes on the Cinematographer (1975).)
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  • 45.
    I understood, by dint of digging into my memories, that modesty helped me to shine, humility helped me to triumph and virtue to oppress.
    (Albert Camus (1913-1960), French-Algerian novelist, dramatist, philosopher. The Fall, p. 90, Gallimard (1956).)
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  • 46.
    A pretty air in an opera is prettier there than it could be anywhere else, I suppose, just as an honest man in politics shines more than he would elsewhere.
    (Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. A Tramp Abroad, ch. 9 (1879).)
  • 47.
    Humility is a grace that shines in a high condition but cannot, equally, in a low one because a person in the latter is already, perhaps, too much humbled.
    (Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1742). Pamela, in Pamela, vol. 4, p. 303.)
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  • 48.
    The sun rarely shines in history, what with the dust and confusion; and when we meet with any cheering fact which implies the presence of this luminary, we excerpt and modernize it.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 163, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, sun, history
  • 49.
    Times of heroism are generally times of terror, but the day never shines in which this element may not work.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Heroism," Essays, First Series (1841, repr. 1847).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, work
  • 50.
    The blaze of reputation cannot be blown out, but it often dies in the socket; a very few names may be considered as perpetual lamps that shine unconsumed.
    (Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Letter, May 1, 1780, to Hester Thrale. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson (1791).)
    More quotations from: Samuel Johnson, shine
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