Quotations About / On: SILENCE

  • 31.
    Silence is the most intolerable of answers.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Fifth Selection, New York (1988).)
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  • 32.
    Since long I've held silence a remedy for harm.
    (Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Agamemnon, l. 177.)
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  • 33.
    Darkness is to space what silence is to sound, i.e., the interval.
    (Marshall McLuhan (1911-1980), Canadian communications theorist, and Harley Parker. "Toward a Spatial Dialogue," ch. 16, Through the Vanishing Point (1968).)
    More quotations from: Marshall McLuhan, silence
  • 34.
    Silence is the element in which great things fashion themselves.
    (Maurice Maeterlinck (1862-1949), Belgian author. "Silence," The Treasure of the Humble (1896), trans. by Alfred Sutro (1908).)
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  • 35.
    Silence is the best response to mystery.
    (Kathleen Norris (b. 1947), U.S. poet and farmer. Dakota, ch. 3 (1993).)
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  • 36.
    The eternal silence of these infinite spaces fills me with dread.
    (Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), French scientist, philosopher. Pensées, nos. 201, 206, no. 201, ed. Krailsheimer; no. 206, ed. Brunschvicg (1670).)
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  • 37.
    Carlyle: a passionate outpouring of words recommending silence and self-control.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, New York (1984).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley, silence
  • 38.
    After an argument, silence may mean acceptance—or the continuation of resistance by other means.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Twelfth Selection, New York (1993).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley, silence
  • 39.
    Silence is the most perfect expression of scorn.
    (George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950), Anglo-Irish playwright, critic. (1921). Ecrasia, in Back to Methuselah, "As Far as Thought Can Reach," The Bodley Head Bernard Shaw: Collected Plays with their Prefaces, vol. 5, ed. Dan H. Laurence (1972).)
  • 40.
    Silence, indifference and inaction were Hitler's principal allies.
    (Immanuel, Baron Jakobovits (b. 1921), British cleric, Chief Rabbi of the British Commonwealth. Independent (London, December 5, 1989). On the prosecution of alleged war criminals.)
    More quotations from: Baron Jakobovits, Immanuel, silence
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