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Quotations About / On: SISTER

  • 21.
    I should fear the infinite power and inflexible justice of the almighty mortal hardly as yet apotheosized, so wholly masculine, with no sister Juno, no Apollo, no Venus, nor Minerva, to intercede for me, thumoi phileousa te, kedomene te.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 65, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
  • 22.
    Best masters for the young writer and speaker are the fault- finding brothers and sisters at home who will not spare him, but will pick and cavil, and tell the odious truth.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. The Journals of Ralph Waldo Emerson, vol. 10, ed. Edward Everett Emerson (1909-1914).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, home, truth
  • 23.
    The great renewal of the world will perhaps consist in this, that man and maid, freed of all false feelings and reluctances, will seek each other not as opposites, but as brother and sister, as neighbors, and will come together as human beings.
    (Rainer Maria Rilke (1875-1926), German poet. Letter, July 16, 1903. Letters to a Young Poet (1934, rev. 1954).)
  • 24.
    We have to divide mother love with our brothers and sisters. Our parents can help us cope with the loss of our dream of absolute love. But they cannot make us believe that we haven't lost it.
    (Judith Viorst (20th century), U.S. novelist and poet. Necessary Losses, ch. 6 (1986).)
  • 25.
    If you are ready to leave father and mother, and brother and sister, and wife and child and friends, and never see them again,—if you have paid your debts and made your will, and settled all your affairs, and are a free man, then you are ready for a walk.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Walking" (1862), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 5, p. 206, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
  • 26.
    Surely a gentle sister is the second best gift to a man; and it is first in point of occurrence; for the wife comes after.
    (Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Pierre (1852), bk. I, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 7, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1971).)
    More quotations from: Herman Melville, sister
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