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Quotations About / On: SKY

  • 21.
    How prone poor Humanity is to dam up the minutest remnants of its freedom, and build an artificial roof to prevent it looking up to the clear blue sky.
    (E.T.A.W. (Ernst Theodor Amadeus Wilhelm) Hoffmann (1776-1822), German author, composer. The Serapion Brethren. By Ernst Theodor Wilhelm Hoffmann, vol. I, sect. 1, p. 9, trans. by Alexander Ewing, George Bell and Sons (1908). Cyprian to his fellow Serapion Brethren, about philistinism.)
  • 22.
    The atomic bomb certainly is the most powerful of all weapons, but it is conclusively powerful and effective only in the hands of the nation which controls the sky.
    (Lyndon Baines Johnson (1908-1973), U.S. president. Congressional Record (House), March 9, 1949, vol. 94, part 2, 80th Congress, 2nd session, p. 1, GPO (1948). In defense of Truman Doctrine.)
    More quotations from: Lyndon Baines Johnson, sky
  • 23.
    What is lawful is not binding only on some and not binding on others. Lawfulness extends everywhere, through the wide-ruling air and the boundless light of the sky.
    (Empedocles 484-424 B.C., Greek philosopher. The Presocratics, p. 142, ed. Philip Wheelwright, The Bobbs-Merrill Co., Inc. (1960).)
    More quotations from: Empedocles, sky, light
  • 24.
    The artist is a receptacle for emotions that come from all over the place: from the sky, from the earth, from a scrap of paper, from a passing shape, from a spider's web.
    (Pablo Picasso (1881-1973), Spanish artist. Trans. in Alfred H. Barr, Jr., Picasso: Fifty Years of His Art (1946). Conversation avec Picasso, vol. 10, no. 10, Cahiers d'Art (1935).)
    More quotations from: Pablo Picasso, sky
  • 25.
    New York ... is a city of geometric heights, a petrified desert of grids and lattices, an inferno of greenish abstraction under a flat sky, a real Metropolis from which man is absent by his very accumulation.
    (Roland Barthes (1915-1980), French semiologist. repr. In The Eiffel Tower and Other Mythologies, trans. by Richard Howard (1979). "Buffet Finishes Off New York," Arts (Paris, 1959).)
    More quotations from: Roland Barthes, sky, city
  • 26.
    The new American finds his challenge and his love in the traffic-choked streets, skies nested in smog, choking with the acids of industry, the screech of rubber and houses leashed in against one another while the townlets wither a time and die.
    (John Steinbeck (1902-1968), U.S. author. Travels With Charley: In Search of America, pt. 2 (1961). Steinbeck added, "This is not offered in criticism but only as observation. And I am sure that, as all pendulums reverse their swing, so eventually will the swollen cities rupture like dehiscent wombs and disperse their children back to the countryside.")
    More quotations from: John Steinbeck, time, love
  • 27.
    Everything that ever walked or crawled on the face of the earth, swum the depths of the ocean or soared through the skies left its imprint here.
    (Robert M. Fresco, and Jack Arnold. Dr. Matt Hastings (John Agar), Tarantula, Looking out at the desert. (1955).)
    More quotations from: Robert M Fresco, ocean
  • 28.
    It is painful to be told that anything is very fine and not be able to feel that it is fine—something like being blind, while people talk of the sky.
    (George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist. Dorothea Brooke Casaubon, the heroine of Middlemarch, ch. 21 (1871-1872). About art criticism.)
  • 29.
    The gates of Hell are open night and day;
    Smooth the descent, and easy is the way:
    But, to return, and view the cheerful skies;
    In this, the task and mighty labour lies.
    (Virgil [Publius Vergilius Maro] (70-19 B.C.), Roman poet. the Sibyl of Cumae, in Aeneid, bk. 6, l. 126-9, trans. by John Dryden. Spoken to Aeneas, in his quest to find his father.)
  • 30.
    Although sleep pressed upon my closing eyelids, and the moon, on her horses, blushed in the middle of the sky, nevertheless I could not leave off watching your play; there was too much fire in your two voices.
    (Propertius Sextus (c. 50-16 B.C.), Roman elegist. Oxford Classical Text, I.10. 7-10.)
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