Treasure Island

Quotations About / On: SLEEP

  • 61.
    Be mine the tomb that swallowed up Pharaoh and all his hosts; let me lie down with Drake, where he sleeps in the sea.
    (Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. White-Jacket (1850), ch. 19, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 5, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1969).)
    More quotations from: Herman Melville, sea
  • 62.
    Instead of water we got here a draught of beer,... a lumberer's drink, which would acclimate and naturalize a man at once,—which would make him see green, and, if he slept, dream that he heard the wind sough among the pines.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Ktaadn" (1848) in The Maine Woods (1864), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 3, p. 30, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
  • 63.
    The reason of idleness and of crime is the deferring of our hopes. Whilst we are waiting, we beguile the time with jokes, with sleep, with eating, and with crimes.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Nominalist and Realist," Essays, Second Series (1844).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, sleep, time
  • 64.
    Think in the morning. Act in the noon. Eat in the evening. Sleep in the night.
    (William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, engraver. "Proverbs of Hell," plate 9, The Marriage of Heaven and Hell (1790).)
    More quotations from: William Blake, sleep, night
  • 65.
    The dandy should aspire to be uninterruptedly sublime. He should live and sleep in front of a mirror.
    (Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet. My Heart Laid Bare, Intimate Journals, sct. 27 (1887), trans. by Christopher Isherwood (1930), rev. Don Bachardy (1989).)
    More quotations from: Charles Baudelaire, mirror, sleep
  • 66.
    It seems not more reasonable to leave the right of printing unrestrained, because writers may be afterwards censured, than it would be to sleep with doors unbolted, because by our laws we can hang a thief.
    (Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. "Milton," Lives of the English Poets (1779-1781). Discussing Milton's Areopagitica.)
    More quotations from: Samuel Johnson, sleep, leave
  • 67.
    A farmer, a hunter, a soldier, a reporter, even a philosopher, may be daunted; but nothing can deter a poet, for he is actuated by pure love. Who can predict his comings and goings? His business calls him out at all hours, even when doctors sleep.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Winter Visitors," Walden (1854).)
  • 68.
    We must be very suspicious of the deceptions of the element of time. It takes a good deal of time to eat or to sleep, or to earn a hundred dollars, and a very little time to entertain a hope and an insight which becomes the light of our life.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Experience," Essays, Second Series (1844).)
  • 69.
    Such is always the pursuit of knowledge. The celestial fruits, the golden apples of the Hesperides, are ever guarded by a hundred-headed dragon which never sleeps, so that it is an Herculean labor to pluck them.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Wild Apples" (1862), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 5, p. 307, Houghton Mifflin (1906). Thoreau refers here to one of the labors of Hercules in Greek mythology.)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau
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