Treasure Island

Quotations About / On: SOLDIER

  • 51.
    Until the end of the Middle Ages, and in many cases afterwards too, in order to obtain initiation in a trade of any sort whatever—whether that of courtier, soldier, administrator, merchant or workman—a boy did not amass the knowledge necessary to ply that trade before entering it, but threw himself into it; he then acquired the necessary knowledge.
    (Philippe Ariés (20th century), French historian. Centuries of Childhood, pt. 1, ch. 4 (1962).)
    More quotations from: Philippe Ariés, soldier
  • 52.
    This hard work will always be done by one kind of man; not by scheming speculators, nor by soldiers, nor professors, nor readers of Tennyson; but by men of endurance—deep-chested, long- winded, tough, slow and sure, and timely.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Farming," Society and Solitude (1870). Edward Emerson noted that Emerson was here referring to the utopian communities of Brook Farm and Fruitlands.)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, work
  • 53.
    Bonaparte knew but one merit, and rewarded in one and the same way the good soldier, the good astronomer, the good poet, the good player.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Spiritual Laws," Essays, First Series (1841, repr. 1847).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, soldier
  • 54.
    Examples are cited by soldiers, of men who have seen the cannon pointed, and the fire given to it, and who have stepped aside from he path of the ball. The terrors of the storm are chiefly confined to the parlour and the cabin.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Prudence," Essays, First Series (1841, repr. 1847).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, fire
  • 55.
    Is this what all these soldiers, all this training, have been for these seventy-nine years past? Have they been trained merely to rob Mexico and carry back fugitive slaves to their masters?
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Slavery in Massachusetts" (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 4, p. 392, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau
  • 56.
    Our housekeeping is mendicant, our arts, our occupations, our marriages, our religion we have not chosen, but society has chosen for us. We are parlor soldiers. We shun the ragged battle of fate, where strength is born.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Self-Reliance," Essays, First Series (1841, repr. 1847). Society.)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, fate, strength
  • 57.
    I believe you to be a brave and a skillful soldier, which, of course, I like. I also believe you do not mix politics with your profession, in which you are right.
    (Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Joseph Hooker, Jan. 26, 1863. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 6, p. 78, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990). Preliminary words to calling a general on the carpet.)
    More quotations from: Abraham Lincoln, soldier, believe
  • 58.
    Soldier or sailor, the fighting man is but a fiend; and the staff and body-guard of the Devil musters many a baton.
    (Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. White-Jacket (1850), ch. 75, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 5, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1969).)
    More quotations from: Herman Melville, soldier
  • 59.
    Man is not a farmer, or a professor, or an engineer, but he is all. Man is priest, and scholar, and statesman, and producer, and soldier.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Oration, August 31, 1837, delivered before the Phi Beta Kappa Society, Cambridge, Massachusetts. "The American Scholar," repr. In Emerson: Essays and Lectures, ed. Joel Porte (1983).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, soldier
  • 60.
    History. An account, mostly false, of events, mostly unimportant, which are brought about by rulers, mostly knaves, and soldiers, mostly fools.
    (Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914), U.S. author. The Devil's Dictionary (1881-1906), repr. In Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce, vol. 7 (1911).)
    More quotations from: Ambrose Bierce, history
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