Quotations About / On: SOLITUDE

  • 21.
    The more powerful and original a mind, the more it will incline towards the religion of solitude.
    (Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British author. "The Essence of Religion: Solitaries and Sociables," Proper Studies (1927).)
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  • 22.
    True solitude is a din of birdsong, seething leaves, whirling colors, or a clamor of tracks in the snow.
    (Edward Hoagland (b. 1932), U.S. novelist, essayist. Weekend Guardian (London, Jan. 20-21, 1990).)
    More quotations from: Edward Hoagland, solitude, snow
  • 23.
    Reading, solitude, idleness, a soft and sedentary life, intercourse with women and young people, these are perilous paths for a young man, and these lead him constantly into danger.
    (Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778), Swiss-born French philosopher, political theorist. Emile, bk. 4 (1762).)
  • 24.
    It has been from Age to Age an Affectation to love the Pleasure of Solitude, among those who cannot possibly be supposed qualified for passing Life in that Manner.
    (Richard Steele (1672-1729), British author. The Spectator, No. 264 (1711).)
    More quotations from: Richard Steele, solitude, love, life
  • 25.
    Love is made by two people, in different kinds of solitude. It can be in a crowd, but in an oblivious crowd.
    (Louis Aragon (1897-1982), French poet. taped discussion in La Révolution Surréaliste, no. 11 (Paris, March 15, 1928), repr. In Recherches sur la Sexualité (January 1928-August 1932). "Second Session," ed. José Pierre (1990).)
    More quotations from: Louis Aragon, solitude, love, people
  • 26.
    Friendship, according to Proust, is the negation of that irremediable solitude to which every human being is condemned.
    (Samuel Beckett (1906-1989), Irish dramatist, novelist. First published in 1931. Proust, p. 46, Grove Press (1957).)
    More quotations from: Samuel Beckett, solitude
  • 27.
    Humility provides everyone, even him who despairs in solitude, with the strongest relationship to his fellow man, and this immediately, though, of course, only in the case of complete and permanent humility.
    (Franz Kafka (1883-1924), Prague German Jewish author, novelist. The Fourth Notebook, February 24, 1918. The Blue Octavo Notebooks, ed. Max Brod, trans. by Ernst Kaiser and Eithne Wilkins. Exact Change, Cambridge, MA (1991). Dearest Father: Stories and Other Writings, trans. by Ernst Kaiser and Eithne Wilkins, New York, Schocken Books (1954).)
    More quotations from: Franz Kafka, solitude
  • 28.
    In his lonely solitude, the solitary man feeds upon himself; in the thronging multitude, the many feed upon him. Now choose.
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 2, p. 520, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Mixed Opinions and Maxims, aphorism 348, "From the Land of the Cannibals," (1879).)
  • 29.
    On the tree, Future, we build our nest; and in our solitude eagles shall bring us nourishment in their beaks!
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 4, p. 126, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980); Thus Spoke Zarathustra, p. 98, trans. by Walter Kaufmann, New York, Penguin Books (1978). Zarathustra, in Thus Spoke Zarathustra, Second Part, "On the Rabble," (1883).)
  • 30.
    We must reserve a back shop all our own, entirely free, in which to establish our real liberty and our principal retreat and solitude.
    (Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. "Of Solitude," The Essays (Les Essais), bk. I, ch. 39, Simon Millanges, Bordeaux, first edition (1580).)
    More quotations from: Michel de Montaigne, solitude
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