Treasure Island

Quotations About / On: SOLITUDE

  • 21.
    I never found the companion that was so companionable as solitude.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden, "Solitude," (1854). Yet, in his journal, Thoreau noted, "It would give me such joy to know that a friend had come to see me, and yet that pleasure I seldom if ever experience." (Dec. 23, 1851).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, solitude
  • 22.
    Multitude, solitude: equal and interchangeable terms for the active and prolific poet.
    (Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. Little Poems in Prose (Paris Spleen), "Crowds," (1861).)
    More quotations from: Charles Baudelaire, solitude
  • 23.
    ... solitude is such a potential thing. We hear voices in solitude, we never hear in the hurry and turmoil of life; we receive counsels and comforts, we get under no other condition ...
    (Amelia E. Barr (1831-1919), U.S. author; born in Scotland. All the Days of My Life, ch. 17 (1913).)
    More quotations from: Amelia E Barr, solitude, life
  • 24.
    It is easy in the world to live after the world's opinion; it is easy in solitude to live after our own; but the great man is he who in the midst of a crowd keeps with perfect sweetness the independence of solitude.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Self-Reliance," Essays, First Series (1841, repr. 1847).)
  • 25.
    Over there, in Europe, all was shame and anger. Here it was exile or solitude, among these languid and agitated madmen who danced in order to die.
    (Albert Camus (1913-1960), French-Algerian novelist, dramatist, philosopher. D'Arrast in Brazil, in Exile and the Kingdom, "The Growing Stone," p. 174, Gallimard (1957).)
    More quotations from: Albert Camus, anger, solitude
  • 26.
    One of the many to whom, from straightened circumstances, a consequent inability to form the associations they would wish, and a disinclination to mix with the society they could obtain, London is as complete a solitude as the plains of Syria.
    (Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. Nicholas Nickleby, ch. 20, p. 246 (1839).)
    More quotations from: Charles Dickens, london, solitude
  • 27.
    In the tumult of men and events, solitude was my temptation; now it is my friend. What other satisfaction can be sought once you have confronted History?
    (Charles De Gaulle (1890-1970), French general, president. War Memoirs, vol. 3, ch. 7 (1959, trans. 1960).)
  • 28.
    Wit is a weapon. Jokes are a masculine way of inflicting superiority. But humour is the pursuit of a gentle grin, usually in solitude.
    (Frank Muir (b. 1920), British humorist, writer. Daily Mail (London, April 26, 1990).)
    More quotations from: Frank Muir, solitude
  • 29.
    Reading, solitude, idleness, a soft and sedentary life, intercourse with women and young people, these are perilous paths for a young man, and these lead him constantly into danger.
    (Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778), Swiss-born French philosopher, political theorist. Emile, bk. 4 (1762).)
  • 30.
    I have at last, after several months' experience, made up my mind that [New York] is a splendid desert—a domed and steepled solitude, where the stranger is lonely in the midst of a million of his race.
    (Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. Daily Alta California (June 5, 1867). Mark Twain's Travels with Mr. Brown, ch. 25, eds. Franklin Walker and G. Ezra Dane, Knopf (1940).)
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