Quotations About / On: SOLITUDE

  • 31.
    We must reserve a back shop all our own, entirely free, in which to establish our real liberty and our principal retreat and solitude.
    (Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. "Of Solitude," The Essays (Les Essais), bk. I, ch. 39, Simon Millanges, Bordeaux, first edition (1580).)
    More quotations from: Michel de Montaigne, solitude
  • 32.
    It is closing time in the gardens of the West and from now on an artist will be judged only by the resonance of his solitude or the quality of his despair.
    (Cyril Connolly (1903-1974), British critic. Horizon (London, Dec. 1949).)
  • 33.
    But the touch or company of any man whatsoever stirreth up their heat, which in their solitude was hushed and quiet, and lay as cinders raked up in ashes.
    (Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. "Upon Some Verses of Virgil," bk. 3, ch. 5, Essays, trans. by John Florio (1588).)
    More quotations from: Michel de Montaigne, solitude
  • 34.
    Solitude is dangerous to reason, without being favourable to virtue.... Remember that the solitary mortal is certainly luxurious, probably superstitious, and possibly mad.
    (Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. repr. In Johnsonian Miscellanies, vol. 1, ed. George Birkbeck Hill, p. 219 (1891). Quoted in Hester Piozzi, Anecdotes of the Late Samuel Johnson (1786).)
    More quotations from: Samuel Johnson, solitude, remember
  • 35.
    Fortunately art is a community effort—a small but select community living in a spiritualized world endeavoring to interpret the wars and the solitudes of the flesh.
    (Allen Ginsberg (b. 1926), U.S. poet. "Mexico and Return to U.S.," entry for July 11, 1954, Journals: Early Fifties Early Sixties, ed. Gordon Ball (1977).)
    More quotations from: Allen Ginsberg, world
  • 36.
    Solitude, the safeguard of mediocrity, is to genius, the stern friend, the cold, obscure shelter where moult the wings which will bear it farther than suns and stars.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Culture," The Conduct of Life (1860).)
  • 37.
    I cannot walk through the suburbs in the solitude of the night without thinking that the night pleases us because it suppresses idle details, just as our memory does.
    (Jorge Luis Borges (1899-1986), Argentinean author. "A New Refutation of Time," Labyrinths (1964).)
  • 38.
    ... solitude is such a potential thing. We hear voices in solitude, we never hear in the hurry and turmoil of life; we receive counsels and comforts, we get under no other condition ...
    (Amelia E. Barr (1831-1919), U.S. author; born in Scotland. All the Days of My Life, ch. 17 (1913).)
    More quotations from: Amelia E Barr, solitude, life
  • 39.
    It is easy in the world to live after the world's opinion; it is easy in solitude to live after our own; but the great man is he who in the midst of a crowd keeps with perfect sweetness the independence of solitude.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Self-Reliance," Essays, First Series (1841, repr. 1847).)
  • 40.
    The poem is about comprehension of beauty. While looking for an apt image, I came across this and learned about Wabi-sabi. I am a Wabi-sabist partially. Actually I had seen an image of an empty worn out wooden chair on Gabriel Garcia Marquez's celebrated novel One hundred years of solitude, although the theme was isolation and endless waiting there, I like that. I am fascinated by still lonely images in exotic interior spaces.
    (Charu Gandhi. In response to the poem 'Just Another')
    More quotations from: Sadiqullah Khan
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