Quotations About / On: SOLITUDE

  • 31.
    Love is made by two people, in different kinds of solitude. It can be in a crowd, but in an oblivious crowd.
    (Louis Aragon (1897-1982), French poet. taped discussion in La Révolution Surréaliste, no. 11 (Paris, March 15, 1928), repr. In Recherches sur la Sexualité (January 1928-August 1932). "Second Session," ed. José Pierre (1990).)
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  • 32.
    Friendship, according to Proust, is the negation of that irremediable solitude to which every human being is condemned.
    (Samuel Beckett (1906-1989), Irish dramatist, novelist. First published in 1931. Proust, p. 46, Grove Press (1957).)
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  • 33.
    Humility provides everyone, even him who despairs in solitude, with the strongest relationship to his fellow man, and this immediately, though, of course, only in the case of complete and permanent humility.
    (Franz Kafka (1883-1924), Prague German Jewish author, novelist. The Fourth Notebook, February 24, 1918. The Blue Octavo Notebooks, ed. Max Brod, trans. by Ernst Kaiser and Eithne Wilkins. Exact Change, Cambridge, MA (1991). Dearest Father: Stories and Other Writings, trans. by Ernst Kaiser and Eithne Wilkins, New York, Schocken Books (1954).)
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  • 34.
    In his lonely solitude, the solitary man feeds upon himself; in the thronging multitude, the many feed upon him. Now choose.
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 2, p. 520, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Mixed Opinions and Maxims, aphorism 348, "From the Land of the Cannibals," (1879).)
  • 35.
    On the tree, Future, we build our nest; and in our solitude eagles shall bring us nourishment in their beaks!
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 4, p. 126, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980); Thus Spoke Zarathustra, p. 98, trans. by Walter Kaufmann, New York, Penguin Books (1978). Zarathustra, in Thus Spoke Zarathustra, Second Part, "On the Rabble," (1883).)
  • 36.
    We must reserve a back shop all our own, entirely free, in which to establish our real liberty and our principal retreat and solitude.
    (Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. "Of Solitude," The Essays (Les Essais), bk. I, ch. 39, Simon Millanges, Bordeaux, first edition (1580).)
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  • 37.
    It is closing time in the gardens of the West and from now on an artist will be judged only by the resonance of his solitude or the quality of his despair.
    (Cyril Connolly (1903-1974), British critic. Horizon (London, Dec. 1949).)
  • 38.
    But the touch or company of any man whatsoever stirreth up their heat, which in their solitude was hushed and quiet, and lay as cinders raked up in ashes.
    (Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. "Upon Some Verses of Virgil," bk. 3, ch. 5, Essays, trans. by John Florio (1588).)
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  • 39.
    Solitude is dangerous to reason, without being favourable to virtue.... Remember that the solitary mortal is certainly luxurious, probably superstitious, and possibly mad.
    (Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. repr. In Johnsonian Miscellanies, vol. 1, ed. George Birkbeck Hill, p. 219 (1891). Quoted in Hester Piozzi, Anecdotes of the Late Samuel Johnson (1786).)
    More quotations from: Samuel Johnson, solitude, remember
  • 40.
    Fortunately art is a community effort—a small but select community living in a spiritualized world endeavoring to interpret the wars and the solitudes of the flesh.
    (Allen Ginsberg (b. 1926), U.S. poet. "Mexico and Return to U.S.," entry for July 11, 1954, Journals: Early Fifties Early Sixties, ed. Gordon Ball (1977).)
    More quotations from: Allen Ginsberg, world
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