Quotations About / On: SONG

  • 1.
    Blues are the songs of despair, but gospel songs are the songs of hope.
    (Mahalia Jackson (1911-1972), U.S. gospel singer, and Evan Mcloud Wylie. Movin' On Up, ch. 6, written with Evan McLoud Wylie (1966).)
    More quotations from: Mahalia Jackson, despair, hope
  • 2.
    "Evil men have no songs."MHow is it then that the Russians have songs?
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 6, p. 62, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Twilight of the Idols, "Maxims and Arrows," section 22 (prepared for publication 1888, published 1889). The adage derives from Johann Gottfried Seume's poem, "Songs.")
    More quotations from: Friedrich Nietzsche, evil
  • 3.
    In writing songs I've learned as much from Cézanne as I have from Woody Guthrie.
    (Bob Dylan [Robert Allen Zimmerman] (b. 1941), U.S. singer, songwriter. Quoted in Clinton Heylin, Dylan: Behind the Shades, ch. 25 (1991).)
    More quotations from: Bob Dylan [Robert Allen Zimmerman]
  • 4.
    Love Songs Now: Fewer broken hearts, more sexual misery.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Third Selection, New York (1986).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley, broken, love
  • 5.
    I suppose any note, no matter how sour, sounds like a song if you hold onto it long enough.
    (Dewitt Bodeen (1908-1988), U.S. screenwriter, Gunther V. Fritsch, and Robert Wise. Mrs. Reed (Jane Randolph), The Curse of the Cat People (1944). Talking to her daughter.)
    More quotations from: Dewitt Bodeen, song
  • 6.
    And she, after swan-like singing her last and dying song, lies beside him, her lover.
    (Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Agamemnon, l. 1444.)
    More quotations from: Aeschylus, song, dying
  • 7.
    Let me make the superstitions of a nation and I care not who makes its laws or its songs either.
    (Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. "Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar," ch. 51, Following the Equator (1897).)
  • 8.
    You can cage the singer but not the song.
    (Harry Belafonte (b. 1927), U.S. singer, civil rights activist. International Herald Tribune (Paris, Oct. 3, 1988). On the arts in South Africa.)
    More quotations from: Harry Belafonte, song
  • 9.
    We're buying this, but why do you sing the same sad songs all women sing?
    (Katharine S. White (1892-1977), U.S. editor and book reviewer. As quoted in Onward and Upward, Prologue, by Linda H. Davis (1986). White, Fiction Editor of the New York Times, sent this note to Phyllis McGinley in the 1940s, along with a check, when buying a skillful, but conventional, story she had submitted. According to McGinley's daughter, she later said "repeatedly" that this had "changed the direction of her whole career.")
    More quotations from: Katharine S White, sad, women
  • 10.
    Some of us prefer Austrian voices risen in song to ugly German threats.
    (Ernest Lehman (b. 1920), U.S. screenwriter. Captain Von Trapp (Christopher Plummer), The Sound of Music, to Herr Zeller (1965).)
    More quotations from: Ernest Lehman, song
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