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Quotations About / On: SORROW

  • 21.
    I do not remember joy or sorrow in childhood, but listening for clues.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Tenth Selection, New York (1992).)
  • 22.
    Two in distress ... make sorrow less.
    (Samuel Beckett (1906-1989), Irish dramatist, novelist. First published in 1938. Neary, in Murphy, p. 52, Grove Press (1959).)
    More quotations from: Samuel Beckett, sorrow
  • 23.
    Joy goes as deep as sorrow, but leaves less of itself behind.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Twelfth Selection, New York (1993).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley, sorrow, joy
  • 24.
    The lyric deals with love and sorrow, the aphorism with contradiction and deceit.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Sixth Selection, New York (1989).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley, lyric, sorrow, love
  • 25.
    Excess of joy is harder to bear than any amount of sorrow.
    (Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Mme. de l'Estorade in a letter to Mme. De Macumer, in Letters of Two Brides (Mémoires de Deux Jeunes Mariées), in La Presse (1841-1842), Souverain (1842), included in the Scènes de la Vie Privée in the Comédie humaine (1845, trans. by George Saintsbury, 1971).)
    More quotations from: Honoré De Balzac, sorrow, joy
  • 26.
    Writing is a refuge from unhappiness, but has its own sorrows.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Fourth Selection, New York (1987).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley
  • 27.
    It seldom happens that any felicity comes so pure as not to be tempered and allayed by some mixture of sorrow.
    (Miguel De Cervantes (1547-1616), Spanish writer. the slave, in Don Quixote, pt. 1, bk. 4, ch. 14, trans. by P. Motteux (1605).)
    More quotations from: Miguel De Cervantes, sorrow
  • 28.
    Whoever, fleeing marriage and the sorrows that women cause, does not wish to wed comes to a deadly old age.
    (Hesiod (c. 8th century B.C.), Greek didactic poet. Theogony, 603.)
    More quotations from: Hesiod, marriage, women
  • 29.
    There's no such thing as old age, there is only sorrow.
    (Edith Wharton (1862-1937), U.S. author. "A First Word," A Backward Glance (1934).)
    More quotations from: Edith Wharton, sorrow
  • 30.
    That mortal man who hath more of joy than sorrow in him, that mortal man cannot be true—not true, or undeveloped.
    (Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Moby-Dick (1851), ch. 96, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 6, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1988).)
    More quotations from: Herman Melville, sorrow, joy
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