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Quotations About / On: SORRY

  • 11.
    Nothing could add to the shudder of going into the house, and she seemed so grieved and frightened that my heart was touched, and I was sorry for her that we had ever met.
    (Jane Grey Swisshelm (1815-1884), U.S. journalist, author, crusader. Half A Century, p. 87, Jansen, McClurg and Company, Chicago (1880).)
  • 12.
    They look quite promising in the shop; and not entirely without hope when I get them back into my wardrobe. But then, when I put them on they tend to deteriorate with a very strange rapidity and one feels so sorry for them.
    (Joyce Grenfell (1910-1979), British actor, writer. "Stately as a Galleon," English Lit (1978). Referring to clothes.)
    More quotations from: Joyce Grenfell, sorry, hope
  • 13.
    One must feel sorry for those who have strange tastes, but never insult them. Their wrong is Nature's too; they are no more responsible for having come into the world with tendencies unlike ours than are we for being born bandy-legged or well- proportioned.
    (Marquis de Sade (1740-1814), French author. Le Chevalier, in "Dialogue the Fifth," Philosophy in the Bedroom (1795).)
  • 14.
    I don't know about bores. Maybe you shouldn't feel too sorry if you see some swell girl getting married to them. They don't hurt anybody most of them, and maybe they're all terrific whistlers or something. Who the hell knows? Not me.
    (J.D. (Jerome David) Salinger (b. 1919), U.S. author. The narrator (Holden Caulfield), in The Catcher in the Rye, ch. 17 (1951).)
  • 15.
    One of the silliest lines ever said in a feature film came from Love Story, the 1970s hit, which immortalized the phrase, "Love means never having to say you're sorry." There are few people who would actually want to share a life with someone who held that concept near and dear.
    (Marge Kennedy (20th century), U.S. author. 100 Things You Can Do to Keep Your Family Together..., Part 4 (1994).)
  • 16.
    Well, Wilmer, I'm sorry indeed to lose you. But I want you to know I couldn't be fonder of you if you were my own son. Well, if you lose a son it's possible to get another. There's only one Maltese falcon.
    (John Huston (1906-1987), U.S. filmmaker. Kasper Gutman (Sydney Greenstreet), The Maltese Falcon, to Wilmer (Elisha Cook, Jr.) upon deciding to making him the fall guy for Captain Jacobi's murder (1941). Based on the novel by Dashiell Hammett.)
    More quotations from: John Huston, son, sorry
  • 17.
    [I]f our reader should be neither informed nor amused, we shall be very sorry for his loss of time as well as our own.
    (Sarah Fielding (1710-1768), British novelist, and Jane Collier. The Cry: A New Dramatic Fable, Introduction (1754).)
    More quotations from: Sarah Fielding, sorry, loss, time
  • 18.
    I ever will profess myself the greatest friend to those whose actions best correspond with their doctrine; which, I am sorry to say, is too seldom the case amongst those nations who pretend most to civilization.
    (J.G. (John Gabriel) Stedman (1744-1797), British soldier, author, artist. Narrative of a Five Years' Expedition Against the Revolted Negroes of Surinam, ch. 24 (1796, repr. 1971).)
  • 19.
    Let children know you are human. It's important for children to see that parents are human and make mistakes. When you're sorry about something you've said or done, apologize! But don't sound guilt ridden. It is best when parents apologize in a manner that is straightforward and sincere.
    (Saf Lerman (20th century), U.S. parenting specialist, writer. Helping Children as They Grow, ch. 1 (1983).)
    More quotations from: Saf Lerman, sorry, children, guilt
  • 20.
    Furnished as all Europe now is with Academies of Science, with nice instruments and the spirit of experiment, the progress of human knowledge will be rapid and discoveries made of which we have at present no conception. I begin to be almost sorry I was born so soon, since I cannot have the happiness of knowing what will be known a hundred years hence.
    (Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), U.S. statesman, writer. Letter, July 27, 1783, to naturalist Sir Joseph Banks, president of the Royal Society. Complete Works, vol. 8, ed. John Bigelow (1887-1888).)
    More quotations from: Benjamin Franklin, sorry, happiness
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