Quotations About / On: SPRING

  • 21.
    The wealthy man is not he who has money, but he who has the means to live in the luxurious state of early spring.
    (Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (1860-1904), Russian author, playwright. Letter, April 29, 1892, to L.A. Avilova. Complete Works and Letters in Thirty Volumes, Letters, vol. 5, p. 58, "Nauka" (1976).)
  • 22.
    Huck waited for no particulars. He sprang away and sped down the hill as fast as his legs could carry him.
    (Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, ch. 29 (1876).)
  • 23.
    They may walk with a little less spring in their step, and the ranks are growing thinner, but let us never forget, when they were young, these men saved the world.
    (Bill Clinton (b. 1946), U.S. president. Washington Post, p. A1 (June 7, 1994). In Normandy, on the 50th anniversary of the Allied landings, June 6, 1944.)
    More quotations from: Bill Clinton, spring, world
  • 24.
    Art is good when it springs from necessity. This kind of origin is the guarantee of its value; there is no other.
    (Neal Cassady (1926-1968), U.S. beat hero. Quoted in Gerald Nicosia, Memory Babe, ch. 5, sect. 5 (1983).)
    More quotations from: Neal Cassady
  • 25.
    Religion and art spring from the same root and are close kin. Economics and art are strangers.
    (Willa Cather (1876-1947), U.S. author. Article first published in Commonweal (April 17, 1936). On Writing, "Four Letters: Escapism," (1949).)
    More quotations from: Willa Cather, spring
  • 26.
    There can be a true grandeur in any degree of submissiveness, because it springs from loyalty to the laws and to an oath, and not from baseness of soul.
    (Simone Weil (1909-1943), French philosopher, mystic. "The Great Beast," pt. 3, Selected Essays, ed. Richard Rees (1962).)
    More quotations from: Simone Weil, loyalty
  • 27.
    Every form of life is in its origin not natural, but divine and human; for it must spring from love, just as there can be no reason without spirit.
    (Friedrich Von Schlegel (1772-1829), German philosopher. Idea 91 in Selected Ideas (1799-1800), translated by Ernst Behler and Roman Struc, Dialogue on Poetry and Literary Aphorisms, Pennsylvania University Press (1968).)
  • 28.
    You must await your thirst and allow it to become complete: otherwise you will never discover your spring, which can never be anyone else's!
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 10, p. 193, selection 5[1], number 54, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Unpublished fragments dating to November 1882February 1883. Originally meant to be attributed to Zarathustra in Thus Spoke Zarathustra.)
    More quotations from: Friedrich Nietzsche, spring
  • 29.
    Everything is becoming science fiction. From the margins of an almost invisible literature has sprung the intact reality of the 20th century.
    (J.G. (James Graham) Ballard (b. 1930), British author. originally published in Books and Bookmen (London, Feb. 1971). Fictions of Every Kind, Re/Search (San Francisco) no. 8/9 (1984). Ballard continued: "Even the worst science fiction is better ... than the best conventional fiction. The future is a better key to the present than the past.")
    More quotations from: J.G. (James Graham) Ballard
  • 30.
    The greatest gift that Oxford gives her sons is, I truly believe, a genial irreverence toward learning, and from that irreverence love may spring.
    (Robertson Davies (b. 1913), Canadian novelist, journalist. repr. In The Enthusiasms of Robertson Davies (1979). "Shakespeare over the Port," Stratford Papers on Shakespeare (1960).)
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