Quotations About / On: SPRING

  • 41.
    Everything is becoming science fiction. From the margins of an almost invisible literature has sprung the intact reality of the 20th century.
    (J.G. (James Graham) Ballard (b. 1930), British author. originally published in Books and Bookmen (London, Feb. 1971). Fictions of Every Kind, Re/Search (San Francisco) no. 8/9 (1984). Ballard continued: "Even the worst science fiction is better ... than the best conventional fiction. The future is a better key to the present than the past.")
    More quotations from: J.G. (James Graham) Ballard
  • 42.
    It is with roses and locomotives (not to mention acrobats Spring electricity Coney Island the 4th of July the eyes of mice and Niagara Falls) that my "poems" are competing.
    (E.E. (Edward Estlin) Cummings (1894-1962), U.S. poet. Is 5, foreword (1926).)
  • 43.
    I believe my ardour for invention springs from his loins. I can't say that the brassiere will ever take as great a place in history as the steamboat, but I did invent it.
    (Caresse Crosby (1892-1970), U.S. literary editor and inventor. As quoted in Feminine Ingenuity, ch. 12, by Anne L. MacDonald (1992). Said in the early 1900s. The inventor of the backless brassiere (under her earlier name, Mary Phelps Peabody) was citing her descendence from Robert Fulton (1765-1815), inventor of the steamboat, as a possible explanation for her ingenuity.)
    More quotations from: Caresse Crosby, history, believe
  • 44.
    A man has every season while a woman only has the right to spring. That disgusts me.
    (Jane Fonda (b. 1937), U.S. screen actor. Quoted in Daily Mail (London, September 13, 1989).)
    More quotations from: Jane Fonda, spring, woman
  • 45.
    The attraction of horror is a mental, or even an intellectual, excitement, but the fascination of the repulsive, so noticeable in contemporary writing, can spring openly from some rotted substance within our civilization ...
    (Ellen Glasgow (1873-1945), U.S. novelist. The Woman Within, ch. 21 (1954). Written in 1937.)
    More quotations from: Ellen Glasgow, spring
  • 46.
    The study of crime begins with the knowledge of oneself. All that you despise, all that you loathe, all that you reject, all that you condemn and seek to convert by punishment springs from you.
    (Henry Miller (1891-1980), U.S. author. "The Soul of Anaesthesia," The Air-Conditioned Nightmare (1945).)
    More quotations from: Henry Miller
  • 47.
    It is our less conscious thoughts and our less conscious actions which mainly mould our lives and the lives of those who spring from us.
    (Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. The Way of All Flesh, ch. 5 (1903).)
    More quotations from: Samuel Butler, spring
  • 48.
    What is a farm but a mute gospel? The chaff and the wheat, weeds and plants, blight, rain, insects, sun—it is a sacred emblem from the first furrow of spring to the last stack which the snow of winter overtakes in the fields.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Nature, ch. 5 (1836, revised and repr. 1849).)
  • 49.
    The wheels and springs of man are all set to the hypothesis of the permanence of nature. We are not built like a ship to be tossed, but like a house to stand.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Nature, ch. 6 (1836, revised and repr. 1849).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, house, nature
  • 50.
    The Xanthus or Scamander is not a mere dry channel and bed of a mountain torrent, but fed by the ever-flowing springs of fame ... and I trust that I may be allowed to associate our muddy but much abused Concord River with the most famous in history.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 10, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
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