Quotations About / On: SPRING

  • 41.
    As every season seems best to us in its turn, so the coming in of spring is like the creation of Cosmos out of Chaos and the realization of the Golden Age.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 346, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, chaos, spring
  • 42.
    Fresh curls spring from the baldest brow. There is nothing inorganic.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 340, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
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  • 43.
    To be a born American citizen seems a guarantee against pauperism; and this, perhaps, springs from the virtue of a vote.
    (Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Redburn (1849), ch. 41, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 4, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1969).)
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  • 44.
    Unfortunately there is nothing more inane than an Easter carol. It is a religious perversion of the activity of Spring in our blood.
    (Wallace Stevens (1879-1955), U.S. poet. Letter, April 23, 1916. Letters of Wallace Stevens, no. 202, ed. Holly Stevens (1967). To his future wife, Elsie Moll Kachel.)
    More quotations from: Wallace Stevens, spring
  • 45.
    Though I do not believe that a plant will spring up where no seed has been, I have great faith in a seed,—a, to me, equally mysterious origin for it.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "The Succession of Forest Trees" (1860), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 5, p. 203, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
  • 46.
    All bad poetry springs from genuine feeling. To be natural is to be obvious, and to be obvious is to be inartistic.
    (Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Gilbert, in The Critic as Artist, pt. 2, published in Intentions (1891).)
    More quotations from: Oscar Wilde, poetry
  • 47.
    It is the essence of poetry to spring, like the rainbow daughter of Wonder, from the invisible, to abolish the past, and refuse all history.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Shakspeare; or, the Poet," Representative Men (1850).)
  • 48.
    We are reformers in spring and summer; in autumn and winter, we stand by the old; reformers in the morning, conservers at night.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Speech, December 9, 1841, at the Masonic Temple, Boston, Massachusetts. "The Conservative," Nature, Addresses, and Lectures (1849).)
  • 49.
    The buds swell imperceptibly, without hurry or confusion, as if the short spring days were an eternity.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, pp. 110-111, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, spring
  • 50.
    It is disturbing to discover in oneself these curious revelations of the validity of the Darwinian theory. If it is true that we have sprung from the ape, there are occasions when my own spring appears not to have been very far.
    (Cornelia Otis Skinner (1901-1979), U.S. author, actor. "The Ape in Me," The Ape in Me (1959).)
    More quotations from: Cornelia Otis Skinner, spring
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